CSO stats show being rich and female is best recipe to a long life

CSO stats show being rich and female is best recipe to a long life

New CSO research has shown that those who live in the most affluent areas of Ireland live around 4.5 - 5 years longer than those who live in deprived areas.

The latest CSO Paper on Mortality Differentials in Ireland 2016-2017 shows that who live in the least deprived areas live longest (84.4 and 87.7 years for males and females respectively) while those in the most deprived areas live to an average age of 79.4 and 83.2 years for males and females respectively.

The report also shows that females live on average three years longer than men and being married, contrary to many perceptions, also ensures a longer life.

The major findings included:

  • Life expectancy at birth favours females by 3.5 additional years
  • Managerial/technical and professional workers have lower mortality rates than those that are unskilled workers
  • Mortality rates are lower for married people than for single people
  • The higher the level of education the lower the mortality rates
  • Galway City and suburbs and Dublin City and suburbs have lowest mortality rates

Commenting on the research paper, Carol Anne Hennessy, Statistician, said life expectancy varies by area of deprivation.

"In 2016, the number of expected life years at birth was 84.4 and 87.7 years for males and females respectively in the least deprived areas, compared to 79.4 years and 83.2 years for those residing in the most deprived areas.

"Furthermore, life expectancy is higher for females across all ages and quintiles. At age 0, females are expected to live 85.5 years compared to 82.0 years for males, a difference of 3.5 years."

The report goes on to reveal those engaged in unskilled and semi-skilled work have a higher standardised mortality rate than managerial, technical and professional workers, with mortality rates ranging from 482 to 796 per 100,000 persons in 2016.

Married persons also have a lower standardised death rate, 699 per 100,000 compared to those that never married, 972 per 100,000 persons, while divorced or separated persons have a mortality rate of 855 per 100,000 persons.

The report also shows that the higher the level of education recorded, the lower the standardised mortality rate with those that ceased full-time education at primary level having a standardised mortality rate of 1,195 per 100,000 persons compared to 619 per 100,000 persons for those that ceased education at third level.

Ms Hennessy concluded: "Those living in Galway and Dublin cities and their suburbs have a lower standardised death rate, 484 and 596 respectively per 100,000 persons compared to 722 per 100,000 persons for those residing in Cork City and suburbs.”

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