US company to bring 600 jobs to Shannon

US company to bring 600 jobs to Shannon
Edwards LifeSciences HQ in California. Pic: via www.edwards.com

Edwards LifeSciences - which produces medical equipment - is investing €80 million in building a new plant.

Around 60 people will be hired this year including production staff, engineering and management and will work at an initial site in the Shannon Free Zone.

Edwards LifeSciences expects to begin hiring new employees in Shannon by June.

The company plans to complete a new, purpose-built manufacturing facility in the Mid-West of Ireland in 2020.

Once the facility is fully operational, the company expects it will employ approximately 600 people.

"Choosing this location included many considerations, but an important one is a talented workforce with experience in medical technology," said Joe Nuzzolese, Edwards’ corporate vice president, global supply chain.

"We look forward to becoming an integral part of the local community through engagement and philanthropic support, and providing educational and professional opportunities for our employees.

"We are excited to welcome these new associates into Edwards, with the shared goal of serving more patients around the world by delivering high quality life-saving technologies."

Digital Desk

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