New group aims to put 30,000 hydrogen-powered cars on the road by 2030

New group aims to put 30,000 hydrogen-powered cars on the road by 2030
Mark Teevan, Chairman of Hydrogen Mobility Ireland and Minister Richard Bruton, Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment at the Hydrogen Mobility Ireland report launch

A new industry group wants to make hydrogen fuel available at filling stations on every main road in the country by 2030.

Hydrogen Mobility Ireland says a network of 76 stations would mean half the population would have one in their town.

Mark Teevan from Toyota Ireland heads up the industry group which hopes the government will put €14 million into the scheme.

He says action to cut carbon emissions in transport is needed sooner rather than later.

"The challenge is to get started since not only is a new infrastructure needed but also the production of a new fuel," said Mr Teevan.

"With Hydrogen Mobility Ireland, we have started the process of coordinating industry’s response to this challenge whilst also planning to align with academic and policy thinking.

"This report is the first output of HMI and leads us to the next part of the challenge which is to implement our findings."

At the launch at Bord Gáis Energy headquarters today, Minister for Communications, Climate Action and the Environment Richard Bruton said: "The Climate Action Plan, launched earlier this year, commits to over 180 actions across every sector of society to step up our response to the climate challenge.

"These actions were chosen based on an assessment of the least cost, least burden options currently available.

"The plan is a rolling plan, designed to integrate best practice as it emerges and adapt to emerging new technologies.

"I welcome this research as a valuable insight into a potential pathway for the introduction of hydrogen vehicles in Ireland between now and 2030."

In 2017, transport accounted for 39% of Ireland's total greenhouse gasses.

According to Hydrogen Mobility Ireland, hydrogen cars, buses and trucks can be a reality by 2023.

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