Job losses loom at major Nestle Wyeth baby foods plant in Limerick

Job losses loom at major Nestle Wyeth baby foods plant in Limerick
Wyeth Nutritionals is looking to make redundancies at its baby formula plant in Co Limerick. Picture: Photocall Ireland

Wyeth Nutritionals, which is owned by Nestle, is looking to make redundancies at its baby formula plant in Co Limerick.

The Askeaton plant employs 600 people, making a wide range of baby and prenatal foods. 

Purchased by Nestle in 2012, Wyeth Nutritionals produces around 40,000 tonnes of formula products annually in powder and liquid forms, mainly for China.

The redundancies come as Nestle plans to reorganise a number of production lines at the Askeaton plant. 

Nestle contacted staff in recent days and is in the early stages of engaging with unions. 

A Nestle spokeswoman confirmed the company was seeking redundancies, but the company wouldn't say how many. 

“Wyeth Nutritionals Ireland Limited is proposing to make some changes through offering a number of redundancies,” the spokeswoman said.

The Askeaton plant was established in 1974 and includes manufacturing and a research and development centre. 

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