Irish supermarkets ring up record sales of €2.8bn during Covid-19 crisis

Irish supermarkets ring up record sales of €2.8bn during Covid-19 crisis
Dunnes Stores continued to lead the Irish grocery market in Ireland last month

Irish consumers spent a record €2.8bn on groceries in the 12 weeks to late March, €250m more than the same period last year, while the price of goods rose by 1.4%.

The average household spent an additional €122 on groceries during the four weeks to March 22, according to market research company, Kantar Worldpanel, as shoppers bought more due to the Covid-19 lockdown.

“Over the past month, we have faced profound changes to our daily lives, as a result of the need for social-distancing, impacting the way we work, shop, and socialise,” said Kantar managing director, David Berry.

Dunnes still leads the grocery market, with a 22.3% share; followed by SuperValu and Tesco, both on 21.3%.

All three saw their sales increase by 10% in the 12 weeks.

However, Lidl was the fastest-growing of the grocery retailers. Its sales grew 14.7% and it increased its market share to 12.3%.

Aldi matched Lidl’s market share and grew sales by 11.9%.

Irish supermarkets ring up record sales of €2.8bn during Covid-19 crisis

“The products demonstrating the strongest growth show a country putting health, hygiene, and practicality first. Sales of hand soap rose by 300% and household cleaners were up by 170%...Facial tissues and loo roll were also in demand, with sales up by 140% and 86%, respectively,” said Mr Berry.

“Looking at our food choices, items with a longer shelf life saw the biggest uplift, as sales of frozen and ambient foods — meaning those that can be stored at room temperature — increased by 32%.

"By comparison, demand for fresh food has been more modest, growing by 16% over the last four weeks.

"While we’d expect sales to remain strong in the coming weeks and months, there will likely be a rebalancing of sales of fresh and non-perishable items,” he said.

One-in-ten households bought supplies online, which is also a high.

More on this topic

Retail in Ireland is amongst the worst hit in EuropeRetail in Ireland is amongst the worst hit in Europe

Aldi announces plans to open new store in CorkAldi announces plans to open new store in Cork

UK retail ‘deeply depressed’ amid Covid-19 shutdown, survey findsUK retail ‘deeply depressed’ amid Covid-19 shutdown, survey finds

Government urged to intervene to save Debenhams workers jobsGovernment urged to intervene to save Debenhams workers jobs


More in this Section

Aer Lingus owner won't say whether it has plans to sue Ireland over Covid-19 quarantineAer Lingus owner won't say whether it has plans to sue Ireland over Covid-19 quarantine

Warning over 'two speed' Irish economy when Covid-19 crisis endsWarning over 'two speed' Irish economy when Covid-19 crisis ends

Hairdressers want further trimming of shortened reopening roadmapHairdressers want further trimming of shortened reopening roadmap

Bank bosses warned over treatment of customers when pandemic payment breaks endBank bosses warned over treatment of customers when pandemic payment breaks end


Lifestyle

Rower Philip Doyle believes there is no gain without pain when it comes to training. “You have to break a body down to build it up,” says the 27-year-old matter of factly.Irish rower Philip Doyle: 'You have to break a body down to built it up'

The bohemian brio of kaftans seems a tad exotic for socially distanced coffee mornings or close-to-home staycations. Perhaps that’s their charm.Trend of the Week: Cool Kaftans - Breezy dressing redefined

Eve Kelliher consults a Munster designer to find out what our future residences, offices and businesses will look likeHow pandemic life is transforming homes and workplaces

Nidge and co return for a repeat of a series that gripped the nation over its five seasons.Friday's TV Highlights: Love/Hate returns while Springwatch looks at rewilding

More From The Irish Examiner