Trump: Covid-19 'affects virtually nobody' as US deaths hit 200k

Trump: Covid-19 'affects virtually nobody' as US deaths hit 200k

Man of contradictions: US President Donald Trump: In March of this year he told veteran investigative journalist Bob Woodward that Covid-19 affects 'plenty of young people.” Picture: AP/Tony Dejak

US President Donald Trump said coronavirus affects, "virtually nobody", despite the fact that almost 200,000 Americans have died since the outbreak began earlier this year.

Speaking to a group of supporters at a rally last night in Ohio, President Trump appeared to once again downplay the severity of the Covid-19 outbreak in the US. 

Mr Trump said: "We know it affects elderly people, elderly people with heart problems and other problems, if they have other problems, that's what it really affects. 

"In some states thousands of people, nobody young. Below the age of 18, nobody. 

Take your hat off to the young, because they have a hell of an immune system. But it affects virtually nobody, it's an amazing thing.

Paradoxically, last week it was reported that, in March of this year, Trump had told veteran investigative journalist Bob Woodward that Covid-19 affects “plenty of young people”.

In one of a series of White House interviews conducted by Mr Woordward, Trump was recorded as saying the virus didn't just affect "old people."

He said: “Now, it’s turning out, it’s not just old people, Bob. 

"Just today and yesterday, some startling facts came out. It’s not just older, It’s plenty of young people.”

Critics of Mr Trump have accused him of lying to the American public about the seriousness of the virus.

The US President's tone on the spread of the Covid-19 has changed numerous times in recent months. 

In public addresses and statements from earlier this year, Trump often seemed to minimize the threat the virus posed to the United States.

In an interview on February 28, he said  the virus was simply going to "disappear". 

Then, in mid-March, Mr Trump said he had always known it was "a real pandemic." 

"I felt it was a pandemic long before it was called a pandemic," he said.

Meanwhile, the number of Covid-19-related deaths in the US is likely to surpass the 200,000 mark in the coming days. 

According to the latest statistics from Johns Hopkins University of Medicine, 199,911 Americans have lost their lives as a result of contracting the virus.

Worldwide, 965,575 have died.

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