French Prime Minister jeered ahead of minute's silence for Nice attack victims

France has marked a national moment of silence in memory of the 84 people killed in the Nice truck attack, as thousands of people massed on the city's waterfront promenade.

French Prime Minister jeered ahead of minute's silence for Nice attack victims

France has marked a national moment of silence in memory of the 84 people killed in the Nice truck attack, as thousands of people massed on the city's waterfront promenade.

With flowers in their hands and tears in their eyes, crowds stood on the rocky beach for several minutes looking towards the Promenade des Anglais, the road where the attack targeting Bastille Day celebrations occurred.

Ahead of the minute's silence, being held at the seafront where the attack happened, crowds jeered French Prime Minister Manuel Vall who had joined thousands in mourning.

Boos rang out as it emerged that confidence in the capacity of the government to combat terrorism had plummeted to an all time low.

There were several placards also spotted in the crowd calling for French President Francois Hollande to resign.

Driver Mohamed Lahouiaej Bouhlel sped his truck through the crowd, killing 84 people including several children and leaving more than 300 others injured.

Among those at the ceremony in Nice was French Prime Minister Manuel Valls, and people fell silent across the nation to remember the victims.

It came after Bouhlel's uncle claimed his nephew was indoctrinated about two weeks ago by an Algerian member of the Islamic State group in Nice.

Sadok Bouhlel said that given his nephew's family problems - he was estranged from his wife and three children - the Algerian "found in Mohamed an easy prey".

Bouhlel's rapid radicalisation has puzzled investigators. Friends and family said he had not been an observant Muslim in the past.

Meanwhile, the French government has defended its efforts to fight IS abroad and at home, announcing new air strikes against their strongholds in the past two days.

President Francois Hollande's Socialist administration has come under blistering criticism from opposition conservatives after the attack in Nice, with former president Nicolas Sarkozy accusing the government of bad policies that he says have failed to prevent three major attacks in the past 18 months.

But Mr Cazeneuve hit back on Monday, listing a series of laws and extra police forces created under Mr Hollande's presidency ''to face a threat that France was not prepared for'' when he took over from Mr Sarkozy in 2012.

After a special security meeting, defence minister Jean-Yves Le Drian said French forces in the US-led coalition struck IS targets again overnight and on Saturday. French war planes have been involved in the operation in Iraq and to a lesser degree in Syria.

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