Pakistan ‘admits militants linked to Mumbai attacks’

A Pakistani intelligence agency has revealed that they have proof that a banned militant group was directly involved in last year’s terror attacks in Mumbai.

A Pakistani intelligence agency has revealed that they have proof that a banned militant group was directly involved in last year’s terror attacks in Mumbai.

A Federal Investigation Agency report, which has been handed over to India, stated that material recovered from Lashkar-e-Taiba (LeT) camps in Karachi and Thatta indicates that terrorists were provided training and weapons in Pakistan by the militant organisation.

India’s prime minister Dr Manmohan Singh said: “Pakistan admitted that terrorists are operating from its soil against India. The dossier handed over to us by Pakistan says Lashkar is responsible for 26/11 beyond doubt.”

Five LeT militants are currently being tried in a Pakistani court based on the findings of the report. This is the first time Pakistanis are being tried inside their own country for terrorist attacks on foreign soil.

The accused include Zaki-ur Rehman Lakhvi, a founding member of the LeT and alleged mastermind behind the Mumbai strikes. The others were named as Zarar Shah, Hammad Amin Sadiq, Mazhar Iqbal and Shahid Jamil Riaz, all activists of the militant group.

The report also stated that the investigation revealed that the “defunct LeT activists conspired, abetted, planned, financed and established communication network to carry out terror attacks in Mumbai”.

Mohammed Ajmal Kasab, the only surviving gunman in the Mumbai attacks, had named Lakhvi and Shah in his statement earlier this month.

Lakhvi, Shah and Iqbal have also been charged with planning, preparation and execution of the attacks and operational handling of all 10 terrorists who came to India.

Pakistani investigators reportedly recovered handwritten diaries, training manuals, Indian maps and operational instructions from the LeT camps in Karachi and Thatta.

The report also reveals that investigators seized militant literature, inflatable life rafts, detailed maps of India’s coast and literature on navigational training.

The anti-terrorism court in Rawalpindi’s Adiala Jail has been adjourned after a brief hearing until August 29 when the trial continues.

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