Memorable day for Hyde family as Tim continues great tradition

Trainer Timmy Hyde completed a bumper double with Feelin’ Groovy and Kelp Forest on a memorable day for his family in Limerick yesterday.

It was a special day for Tim (16), a transition year student in Glenstal Abbey, as he became the fourth generation of the Hyde family to ride a winner, partnering Feelin’ Groovy to an eight lengths win over The Big Galloper in the four-year-old bumper.

The Mastercraftsman gelding shot through on the inside turning for home and, soon in command, stayed on strongly for an emphatic victory, prompting winning trainer and proud grandfather Timmy to comment: “He’s in school in Glenstal and will get a great kick out of this. The horse wasn’t bought for this job. He’s not very big and might run in a winners bumper for Tim, but he’s a good jumper and he’ll go hurdling soon enough.”

The Hyde 81.5/1 double was completed when Kelp Forest, ridden by Stephen Connor, got the better of odds-on favourite Clinton Hill (Patrick Mullins) by three-quarters of a length in the Buy Twilight Racing Tickets Online Fat Race, with another previous winner, Warlike Intent, back in third.

“My thoughts are with (the late) William Codd, who used to train this horse – I would never have brought him home if William was still alive,” explained Hyde. 

“He had a very good run in the Land Rover bumper, when he got into a bit of bother but came home well. He didn’t run well in his next two races, but he’s back on track now. I have no immediate plans for him.

Runner-up in her last two starts and more than entitled to score at this level, 4/6 favourite Castafiore Park gave Paul Nolan and Bryan Cooper a second win in three days when landing the mares maiden hurdle emphatically by eleven lengths from longshots Lily Trotter and The Last Armada.

Nolan admitted: “It would have been a long journey home if she got beaten in that. She was entitled to win one and we decided not to complicate things. She had some good form and I hope she can continue to improve. She’ll go handicapping and stick to mares races. The way she jumps, she should be better over fence.”

Jack Kennedy emerged with four winners at Cheltenham last week. But he has seldom had to work as hard as he did on Pete So High, which pipped Randalls Ur Poet in the Follow Limerick Racecourse On Facebook Hurdle and then survived a Stewards Enquiry into possible interference before and at the second last flight.

The winner, trained for Gigginstown by Gordon Elliott (who registered a treble in Down Royal) is talented but clearly quirky and ran about before knuckling down and getting there on the nod.

Davy Condon, representing Elliott, explained: “He was too keen the last day and we took off the cheekpieces. 

He settled a lot better today and Jack got the best out of him. He looks a real two-miler on better ground.”

Trainer/rider Denis Hogan won the Follow Limerick Racecourse On Twitter Maiden Hurdle with The Granson which made all and was left clear when odds-on favourite Crezic, a close second and challenging, crashed at the final flight.

“I was very afraid of Gordon’s horse beforehand and I’m not sure how well he was going when he fell,” said Hogan.

“My horse was hanging all the way up the straight. I couldn’t steer him and it was just as well the rail was there. He was with Sandra Hughes and had some good form. But it’s been a bit stop-start with him. It’s hard to know where he’ll go now, maybe for one of those rated novice hurdles.”

Rachael Blackmore quipped: “It’s easy when you’re riding for that man (John Joe Walsh) around here,” after Princess Mahler, owned by the Dublin-based Curb Your Enthusiasm Syndicate, landed the Limerick Family Fun Day Mares Handicap Hurdle at the expense of Bracklin Princess.



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