Here's how Cork City Marathon organisers used technology to look after runners

Technology played a leading part in the management of this year’s Cork City Marathon, writes Eoin English of the Irish Examiner.

Here's how Cork City Marathon organisers used technology to look after runners

Technology played a leading part in the management of this year’s Cork City Marathon, writes Eoin English of the Irish Examiner.

There was specialist medical and logistics programmes providing real time feeds on the movement of marathon medical vehicles and on injured runners.

Volunteer Cathal O’Mullane built a real-time app to instantaneously log all medical injuries on the health teams’ phones while Tetra Ireland provided a communications programme that meant all vehicle movement could be monitored from a screen in the control room at Cork City Fire Brigade headquarters.

Up to 57 runners were treated for injuries at the ‘field hospital’ and across the race course with the majority presenting with heat-induced hyperthermia, displaying temperatures of up to 40 degrees.

Three people were taken to hospital but the majority of these were non-running related injuries such as falls.

Pic: Darragh Kane.
Pic: Darragh Kane.

Cork City Marathon Chief Medical officer, Dr Jason Van der Velde said: “Injury numbers weren’t up or down on other years despite the warm weather and the increased number of participants.”

Tetra Ireland provided Cork City Marathon with an automated vehicle location system for use on mobile phones and VHF walkie talkies.

This meant that "the location of all live moving assets" like ambulances, paramedic vehicles, first responder vehicles, bikes and golf buggies that were used in the logistics of the event could be viewed in real time in the event of a major emergency.

Over 100 medical, nursing and ambulance staff volunteered at the Cork marathon as did many more medical students.

“They took part in months of preparation between attending logistics meetings and medical education meetings. We are chuffed at how well the day came together. It is such a great event in the Cork city calendar,” said Dr Van der Velde.

Volunteers from the Irish Red Cross, the Order of Malta, St John’s Ambulance and Civil Defence all gave up their Bank Holiday Sunday to help out at the event, with many of them at the route since 7am today.

The National Ambulance Service also supplied volunteer staff.

More in this section

Sport
Newsletter

Latest news from the world of sport, along with the best in opinion from our outstanding team of sports writers

Sign up
IE_logo_newsletters

Select your favourite newsletters and get the best of Irish Examiner delivered to your inbox