Sin bin motion in hurling soundly defeated at GAA Congress

With no speakers in favour of it and Antrim chairman Ciarán McCavana claiming it would be as welcome in his country as Joe Brolly on The Sunday Game, it was expected to fail and ultimately received just 18% of delegates’ support.

Sin bin motion in hurling soundly defeated at GAA Congress

The black card/sin bin will remain confined to Gaelic football as the motion to introduce it to hurling was soundly defeated at GAA’s Annual Congress in Croke Park this morning.

With no speakers in favour of it and Antrim chairman Ciarán McCavana claiming it would be as welcome in his country as Joe Brolly on The Sunday Game, it was expected to fail and ultimately received just 18% of delegates’ support.

Playing rules committee chairman David Hassan highlighted that in a study of 20 games in last year’s All-Ireland senior hurling championship there was an average of 26 fouls per game in which almost half the fouls (12) could be considered cynical in nature.

Across those 20 games, there were 19 professional fouls. Hassan acknowledged there was a wide spectrum of opinion on the proposal but concluded: “We should not conflate what people want with what the game (of hurling) needs.”

Cork’s motion to apply replays to All-Ireland semi-finals that finish level at the end of normal time was defeated with just 27% of delegates backing it. Put forward by St Ita’s, their idea was opposed by Connacht secretary John Prenty who said more replays would take away from the certainty of the fixtures calendar and would be a retrograde step.

After seeing their black card proposal quashed as well as their idea of ending the role of

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Following the end of the Allianz Leagues, any player who chooses not to claim such a mark in the large or small rectangle can be challenged immediately by an opponent.

Wicklow’s call to increase the value of a pointed sideline cut was heavily defeated, receiving just 23%. Kilkenny spoke strongly against the motion and were backed by Galway.

Down’s recommendation that club games be extended in duration to 70 minutes to come into line with senior inter-county matches was also beaten comprehensively.

The playing rules also called on the advantage rule to be amended so that a free instead of advantage be awarded if a goal opportunity is not deemed to be on by the referee and the foul has taken place in a scoring area, the guidelines being on or inside the 45-metre line in Gaelic football and on or inside the 65-metre line in hurling.

However, like the maor foirne motion it narrowly failed to receive the required 60% support, again falling short by 1%.

The last of the playing rules motions, Wexford club Naomh Éanna’s recommendation that just two players and a management official per team have speaking rights with referees, received 46%, 14% shy of coming into rule.

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