Let’s remember: An Irish life worth honouring

It’s almost 104 years since quartermaster Sgt TW Fitzpatrick of the 2nd Royal Irish Regiment, on August 23, 1914, stopped a German advance at Mons for 11 hours with the support of no more than a committed force of 50 drivers, cooks and ancillaries.

Let’s remember: An Irish life worth honouring

It’s almost 104 years since quartermaster Sgt TW Fitzpatrick of the 2nd Royal Irish Regiment, on August 23, 1914, stopped a German advance at Mons for 11 hours with the support of no more than a committed force of 50 drivers, cooks and ancillaries.

He went on to have an illustrious 42-year army career and retired as a lieutenant colonel.

During his career he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal, the Croix de Guerre by the French, and the Cross of St George by the Russians along with many other decorations.

Fitzpatrick was born in Wexford in 1879 and died in London in 1965 and was buried with his wife in Surrey.

That grave has been vandalised and is in a very poor state.

Fitzpatrick epitomises the long-scorned contribution Irish people made in both world wars.

It seems appropriate that we, through the State, reinstate his grave and his memory.

After all, if the Department of Foreign Affairs can “assist” the increasingly discredited millionaire Conor McGregor in his New York court case, then remembering a man of real achievement, and his peers too, should be an honour.

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