How are other countries stopping the spread of Covid-19?

From mandatory quaratines, to tracking apps to push ups, countries are taking a variety of steps to stop the virus spreading in communities. 
How are other countries stopping the spread of Covid-19?

Serbia's Novak Djokovic stands on the balcony at his accommodation in Adelaide, Australia during the week, as more than 70 tennis players and their entourages were confined to their hotel rooms. Picture: AP

As new Covid variants pose a new and increased threat, the Government is coming under pressure to introduce hotel quarantining.

Deputy Chief Medical Officer Ronan Glynn yesterday told the Oireachtas Health Committee that Nphet had previously advised that a mandatory quarantining in designated facilities be introduced and this advice has not changed.

He said the current system "will not stop all non-essential travel into Ireland".

Other countries have taken far stricter approaches, from GPS bracelets, to full border lockdowns, or requiring passengers to stay in designated facilities for at least two weeks.

HOTEL STAYS

Australia has imposed a strict policy which requires travellers, including returning Australians, to quarantine in a hotel chosen by the Government for at least 14 days. However, this can be extended to up to 24 days in some cases.

Australia, which recorded just five new cases yesterday hit the headlines recently after a number of professional tennis stars complained about the less-than five star conditions they have been put up in ahead of the Australian Open.

More than 70 players and their entourages have been confined to their hotel rooms for 14 days, with Bernard Tomic’s girlfriend Vanessa Sierra complaining on a social media video that she would have to wash her own hair as she was not allowed visit a salon.

Travellers, who are charged between $2,500 (€1,580) and $3,000 (€1,914) depending on the State they arrive in, are provided with meals, that are placed outside their rooms each day.

Rob Kearney and fiancée Jess Redden have also documented their stay in a Brisbane quarantine hotel ahead of the rugby player's move to Perth team Western Force.

Ms Reden joked about training in their hotel room and said: "We were all transported by bus and escorted by officers (who are lovely!) they bring you to your room and guard your floor each day and night. It’s all very well organised over here.”

New Zealand, which is regarded as one of the most successful countries in the world in preventing the spread of the virus, also requires everyone entering the country to stay in quarantine facilities.

Tens of thousands of people have completed managed isolation, which costs $3,100 (€1825.53).

DENIED ENTRY

Many countries are simply now denying access to all non-residents or foreign nationals in a bid to stop the spread of the virus.

Malaysia has banned foreign nationals from entering the country, except for those holding certain categories of residence visas and employment passes, This measure is due to last until at least the end of March.

Since March, Israel has only allowed foreign citizens who are residents to enter the country, and all are obliged to spend 14 days after arrival in quarantine. Very few international flights are operating to and from Israel.

Other countries that have implemented similar measures include Cambodia, Thailand and Georgia.

TRACKING BRACELETS

People entering a number of countries are now given a welcome present of a bracelet that tracks their movements and ensures they do not break quarantining rules.

A Kuwaiti national, residing abroad, shows the tracking bracelet provided by authorities as she leaves at the Kuwait International airport in the capital upon her return as part of a repatriation plan on April 19, 2020, and ahead of being taken to mandatory home quarantine. Picture: Getty

A Kuwaiti national, residing abroad, shows the tracking bracelet provided by authorities as she leaves at the Kuwait International airport in the capital upon her return as part of a repatriation plan on April 19, 2020, and ahead of being taken to mandatory home quarantine. Picture: Getty

Hong Kong, which has a population of 7.5m, has recorded a total of 9,797 cases and 166 deaths.

Hong Kong requires people arriving from other countries to wear a wristband while self-isolating for two weeks. It is designed to detect if a person has left their hotel room or house.

In September, it was announced that international passengers arriving in Abu Dhabi would have to wear a tracking device while they complete a mandatory 14-day home quarantine.

This medically approved devise is fitted by the authorities at Abu Dhabi Airport after a person clears immigration.

ISOLATION SELFIE

In March, Poland launched a smartphone app to monitor those entering the country.

Those using the app, which uses geolocation and facial recognition, are required to check-in with authorities by taking a selfie.

"People in quarantine have a choice: either receive unexpected visits from the police, or download this app," Karol Manys, digital ministry spokesman said after the app was introduced.

Users first register a selfie through the app which then randomly requests more selfies throughout the day.

The app notifies police if users fail to respond within 20 minutes.

PUSH-UPS AGAINST COVID

Bali has adopted a strange penalty for those caught not wearing face masks.

A resident does push-ups in May last year as a sanction for breaking large-scale social restriction regulations in Indonesia.

A resident does push-ups in May last year as a sanction for breaking large-scale social restriction regulations in Indonesia.

The Indonesian resort has introduced punishment push-ups with video footage emerging this week of police officers forcing tourists to do the exercise.

Face masks are mandatory in public, however, increasing numbers have been caught without face coverings.

It has been reported that more than 70 people paid a fine of 100,000 rupiah (€5.86), but about 30 others were ordered to do 50 push-up when they said they they did not have the money on the.

Those who were not properly wearing a face mask were given the punishment of 15 press-ups.

The island remains officially closed to overseas tourists but is home to many long-term residents from abroad.

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