New research reveals how Irish people coped with the pandemic 

New research reveals how Irish people coped with the pandemic 

When looking at the impact of Covid 19, respondents in Ireland identified the economy, the mental health of the nation and remote working as the matters on which they believe the pandemic will have a lasting impact.

More adults in Ireland now believe that there is a decline in the stigma associated with mental health issues than in other countries across the globe, new research has revealed. 

A new major research study has been published by insurance company Axa, examining the attitudes to mental health and the pandemic in 11 countries, including Ireland.

The results have revealed how people in different countries have coped with the pandemic, along with their thoughts on the key issues impacting mental health.

When looking at the impact of Covid 19, respondents in Ireland identified the economy (55%), the mental health of the nation (54%) and remote working (49%) as the matters on which they believe the pandemic will have a lasting impact.

When asked about their own mental health, more Irish adults were likely to admit they found themselves “getting agitated” (69%), feeling "downhearted and blue” (65%) and “found it hard to wind down” (65%) when the survey was conducted late last year.

This was higher than the average responses to this in other countries, which stood at 56%, 59% and 59% respectively.

More respondents in Ireland also acknowledged a history of mental health disorders in their families than in other countries.

However, Irish respondents were found to be more optimistic that the stigmas associated with mental illness are declining.

A total of 52% of adults surveyed in Ireland agreed the stigma associated with having a mental health condition was declining compared to just 31% elsewhere.

An extract from the report. Axa has published a major research study examining attitudes to mental health and the pandemic in 11 countries, including Ireland. 
An extract from the report. Axa has published a major research study examining attitudes to mental health and the pandemic in 11 countries, including Ireland. 

More adults in Ireland also said their empathy and compassion for others had increased over the past year, with 47% agreeing with this, compared to just 31% across all countries.

A total of 63% said they trust friends and family to provide mental health support, which was in line with other countries, aside from two – Italy and Japan.

In Italy, the average for respondents who agreed with this statement stood at just 49% while in Japan it was 43%.

Workplace and work-life balance

Respondents in Ireland were also more likely to feel safe from bullying and harassment at work, with 67% agreeing with this, compared to an average of 60% elsewhere.

Over half (53%) in Ireland cited a very positive culture at their workplace, compared to 48% elsewhere.

A total of 52% of adults in Ireland described their work-life balance as “excellent”, which is slightly above the average of 50%.

Irish adults were generally more positive, as 56% agreed with the statement that they “often experience joy and elation”. 

The corresponding figure for respondents across the 11 countries was 44%.

Post-pandemic, respondents were asked what they were most looking forward to. For Irish respondents, the top answer was travel at 66%, followed by reconnecting with family at 54%.

The survey was conducted in September and October of last year among adults between 18 and 75 years of age in 11 countries.

It was conducted by international research agency, IPSos, with 1,000 adults in Ireland participating.

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