Working remotely and not commuting saving Irish workers an average of one hour per day

Working remotely and not commuting saving Irish workers an average of one hour per day

Not having to commute was cited as the main benefit of being able to work from home. File Picture: Larry Cummins

Working remotely and not having to commute is saving Irish office workers 58 minutes per day on average, according to new research.

The survey, conducted by Censuswide on behalf of IT services provider Auxillion, found that the majority of the 500 people who took part (59%) said they were using this additional time to relax or to be with their families.

In terms of location, the workers saving the most time were from Cavan (121 minutes), Westmeath (around 77 minutes), Kildare (over 71 minutes), Kilkenny (just under 68 minutes) and Wexford (65 minutes).

The research found that more than a third of Irish office workers (35%) believe working remotely has improved their mental health. 

Some 39% said their physical health had improved of being at home, while 59% believe their general work/life balance had improved.

Overall, 82% of respondents said they wanted their company to offer a hybrid working policy when lockdown restrictions end.

Benefits

The survey also asked respondents to list the main benefits of being able to work from home.

Unsurprisingly, not having to commute was cited as the main benefit by 53% of respondents.

Saving money and a better work/life balance were each noted by 51% of participants.

44% said working from home gave them more flexibility, while a reduction in carbon footprints/environmental benefits were cited by 38%.

Many office workers said both their physical and mental health improved as a result of working from home. File Picture
Many office workers said both their physical and mental health improved as a result of working from home. File Picture

The vast majority of office workers surveyed (89%) said they were as productive working remotely as they were in the office.

Speaking following the publication of the research results, Eleanor Dempsey, Director of Consulting & Competency, Auxilion, said Irish businesses need to appreciate that the role and priority of work in their employees′ lives has changed as aresult of the Covid-19 pandemic.

"While some organisations may never return to the office, others will be welcoming staff back in the months to come – putting an intense spotlight on their long-term strategies for staff, infrastructure, processes and governance," she said. 

Ms Depmsey said the hybrid conversation "was no longer about getting people connected during a crisis, but embracing it as the new normal and, perhaps more crucially, deploying it as a means of talent acquisition and retention."

“This requires a shift in mindset and it’s key that businesses don’t just prolong old thinking with new technologies and automated processes. 

They really need to examine their business strategies and governance controls in the context of the new expectations of the workforce, and leverage it as an opportunity to both empower staff and drive business growth,” she added.

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