Covid-19: 'Many people have been exposed to information that is false, inaccurate, or misleading'

Covid-19: 'Many people have been exposed to information that is false, inaccurate, or misleading'

The Department of Health announced the figures as Dr Ronan Glynn urged people not to rely on unsubstantiated information about the virus.

The deputy chief medical officer has called on people to help stop the spread of misinformation, as a further 1,386 cases of Covid-19 were confirmed in Ireland.

The Department of Health announced the figures as Dr Ronan Glynn urged people not to rely on unsubstantiated information about the virus.

"This pandemic has provided a prime example of how easily misinformation can spread online, and many people have been exposed to information that is false, inaccurate, or misleading," said Dr Glynn.

"This is known as misinformation and it started to spread about potential Covid-19 vaccines even before any had been developed. 

"Unfortunately, it has undermined vaccination efforts in many countries, prolonging the pandemic and putting lives at risk."

The Department added that 106 Covid-19 patients are hospitalised, with 22 currently in ICU.

Dr Glynn moved to remind the public that not all posts on social media are reliable or accurate.

“In Ireland, we are fortunate to have very high levels of vaccine confidence with fantastic uptake across all age groups to date. 

"Of course, many people will have questions about their vaccine but it is important that they access accurate and reliable information in order to get these questions answered,” Dr Glynn said.

Do not rely on unsubstantiated information shared online. Instead, go to trusted sources including hse.ie and gov.ie, GPs, and healthcare professionals will also be able to answer any questions you may have when you go to your vaccine appointment.

It comes as the Moderna vaccine has been approved for use in the EU for children aged 12 to 17.

The European Medicines Agency (EMA) said that its human medicines committee has recommended granting an extension of indication for the Spikevax jab (previously Covid-19 Vaccine Moderna) to include use in children aged 12 to 17 years.

It has already been authorised for people aged 18 and over.

The EU’s health regulator said that the vaccine will be used for children aged 12 to 17 the same way as it is used for adults.

“It is given as two injections in the muscles of the upper arm, four weeks apart,” the EMA said.

The effects of the Spikevax jab were investigated in a study of 3,732 children aged 12 to 17 years.

The efficacy of the jab in those aged 12 to 17 is similar to that in adults. The EMA said that the most common side effects were also similar.

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