Preliminary reports link four stillbirths to Covid-19, says deputy CMO

Dr Glynn was speaking at Thursday evening’s public health briefing, where 39 further deaths and 482 new cases of Covid-19 were confirmed
Preliminary reports link four stillbirths to Covid-19, says deputy CMO

Dr Ronan Glynn said the HSE’s National Women and Infants Programme was monitoring the situation closely. Picture: Leah Farrell / RollingNews.ie

The Deputy CMO has said the Department of Health is aware of four preliminary reports of stillbirths associated with a condition called ‘Covid Placentitis.’ 

Covid Placentitis is a rare complication of maternal Covid-19 infection that can lead to infection of the placenta and stillbirth.

Dr Ronan Glynn said the reports should be interpreted “with caution”, given that coroners have not yet concluded their findings.

He said the HSE’s National Women and Infants Programme was aware of the situation and was monitoring it closely. A related notice on Covid Placentitis has been also been issued to obstetric departments around the country, he said.

"I would ask that the privacy of all those affected by this disease continue to be respected at all times."

Dr Glynn was speaking at Thursday evening’s public health briefing, where 39 further deaths and 482 new cases of Covid-19 were confirmed.

There has now been a total of 4,396 Covid-19-related deaths in Ireland since the pandemic began last year, and 221,649 cases have been reported here.

Of the deaths reported on Thursday, 10 occurred this month. 

Twelve more occurred in February, 13 in January and three occurred last year. 

One other death remains under investigation.

Also on Thursday evening, chair of the Nphet Irish Epidemiological Modelling Advisory Group, Professor Philip Nolan said the country's virus reproductive or ‘R’ number has been stable and may have even decreased slightly in recent weeks.

“This is reflected in the week-on-week decline in cases that has been reported recently,” he said.

This represents an extraordinary effort over a very challenging nine-week period that has brought us from 6,500 cases to under 600.

Of the cases notified today:

  • 224 are men;
  • 236 are women;
  • 69% are under 45 years of age;
  • The median age is 31 years old;
  • 207 are located in Dublin;
  • 29 are in Cork;
  • 26 are in Meath;
  • 20 are in Kildare;
  • 18 are in Galway;

As of 8am this morning, 460 patients were hospitalised with Covid-19 – 107 of whom were in intensive care. 

26 additional hospitalisations have been recorded in the past 24 hours.

The 14-day incidence rate of the virus is now 190.2 per 100,000 population. 

The seven-day incidence rate is 88.0, and the five-day moving average is 536.

Validation of data at the HPSC has resulted in the denotification of two previously confirmed cases. 

The figure of 221,649 total confirmed cases above reflects this

Vaccines

As of March 1, 446,474 doses of the Covid-19 vaccine had been administered in Ireland.

303,550 people have received their first dose, and 142,92 people have received their second dose and are fully vaccinated.

Household cases associated with student outbreak

Dr Breda Smyth, Director of Public Health, HSE West at the media briefing this evening at the Department of Health. Picture: Leah Farrell / RollingNews.ie

Dr Breda Smyth, Director of Public Health, HSE West at the media briefing this evening at the Department of Health. Picture: Leah Farrell / RollingNews.ie

Director of Public Health at HSE West Dr Breda Smyth said more than 200 households around the country had experienced an outbreak of Covid-19 as a result of a recent outbreak among students.

“We know that the new variant is more transmissible, and, based on the latest data, approximately a third of household contacts of confirmed cases in Ireland are now testing positive,” she said.

She urged anyone displaying symptoms of Covid-19 to immediately self-isolate and phone their GP.

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