Three out of four people regret conversations they never had with loved ones before they died

Three out of four people regret conversations they never had with loved ones before they died

Sarah Corbett Lynch, who helped launch Bereaved Children’s Awareness Week.

Seventy four per cent of people regret not having conversations with their loved ones before they passed away, according to a new survey.

Of these, 50% said there were "so many conversations" they wished they had before their loved one died.

And 25% said their loved one should have clarified funeral or inheritance wishes.

Some 50% of those surveyed said they found it difficult to address someone's loss, and almost half (46%) said they would struggle to speak comfortably about death with their family.

This is according to a survey carried out by insurer Royal London, where more than 1,000 adults in Ireland were asked questions about death.

The study found that 54% of respondents who experienced a loss reported conversations with friends was the primary way they coped.

Religion and faith as a source of comfort was highest in people aged 75-84, with 26% of this age group saying they used faith to help grieve. Only 8% of those aged 25-34 said religion helped them.

Conversely, 35% of 25-34 year-olds felt that keeping busy with work and hobbies helped, while just 19% of older respondents (75-84-year-olds) felt the same.

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