On This Day: Violent murder of Jason Corbett with brick and bat shocks nation

One grieving family reached out to help another by paying for the body of Mr Corbett to be flown home from America
On This Day: Violent murder of Jason Corbett with brick and bat shocks nation

Jason Corbett died from head injuries after a sustained assault with a brick and a baseball bat at his  home in North Carolina. Picture: Brendan Gleeson

2015

Five years ago, Irish Examiner readers were learning about the shocking murder of father-of-two Jason Corbett.

One grieving family reached out to help another by paying for the body of Mr Corbett to be flown home from America for his funeral in Limerick.

Mr Corbett died from head injuries after a sustained assault with a brick and a baseball bat at his family home in the town of Wallburg in North Carolina.

His wife, Molly Martens, and her father, FBI agent Thomas Martens, were later convicted of his murder.

Colin and Eithne Bell from Co Down, parents of Kevin Bell, 26, who was killed in a hit-and-run in New York, paid to have Mr Corbett’s remains repatriated.

Elsewhere, the government was urged to implement long-awaited plans to combat the illegal trade of prescription sedatives which were fuelling “aggression” and chaos on the streets.

The paper announced that 400,000 tablets were seized in 2013 —  a 150% jump since 2010.

Young dealers were making €1,000 a week selling prescription sedatives. Picture: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

Young dealers were making €1,000 a week selling prescription sedatives. Picture: Jonathan Brady/PA Wire

Young dealers were making €1,000 a week selling prescription sedatives, Independent TD Maureen O’Sullivan said as she pressed then drugs minister Aodhan O Riordain, prepared by former drugs minister Roisin Shortall, to implement plans to tackle illicit trade of benzodiazepines and ‘Z’ drugs .

2010

A decade ago, the banks hit the headlines once again.

While broke Irish banks were flooded with more than €30bn in Irish taxpayers’ money, Anglo Irish Bank, Bank of Ireland and AIB continued to lavish luxury perks on employees.

Gym and social fees were paid for many staff members, and car allowances for senior executives were also on the cards. It came in the wake of hikes in mortgage rates for struggling customers.

2000

A cherubic child plays with her smiling parents on the front page of the Irish Examiner 20 years ago today.

Little Megan Burke had survived a successful operation in London to fix the hole in her heart. Megan, just 15 months old, had been living with a death sentence. Before the operation, she could not walk without getting breathless and turning blue.

She was on a long waiting list for the life-saving operation.

But public donations of £40,000 allowed her parents, Anna and John, from Tramore, Co. Waterford, to pay for the four-hour operation privately in Great Ormond Street hospital.

And just three days after the open-heart surgery, the Irish Examiner could report that little Megan was able to sit up and play with her favourite toy.

1970

50 years ago, a no-confidence vote in Northern Ireland's Prime Minister hit the headlines, while readers were also finding out about plans for a pharma giant to enhance its presence in Cork.

Pfizer announced plans to apply for planning permission from Cork County Council to build a £2.5m extension at its Ringaskiddy centre, further cementing its presence in and commitment to the area.

Five decades on, the company now employs almost 4,000 people across six sites in Ireland.

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