On This Day: Frustrated farmers and political pay rises dominate the headlines

Atense four-hour standoff at a  shop in Tralee ended peacefully and a stillborn baby was found on Kerry beach
On This Day: Frustrated farmers and political pay rises dominate the headlines

Farmers blockade the entrance to the Tesco Distribution Plant at Donabate in protest at beef prices.Picture Colin Keegan, Collins Dublin

Frustrated farmers and political pay rises were on the front page of the Irish Examiner 12 months ago. The more things change...

Taoiseach Micheál Martin was hitting headlines last August though, at the time, he was in opposition. The leader of Fianna Fáil had received a €30,000 pay bump through an allowance claimed by his party, bringing his salary to almost €125,000. This had drawn some criticism. 

An Taoiseach Micheál Martin in his office at Government Buildings. Photograph Moya Nolan.
An Taoiseach Micheál Martin in his office at Government Buildings. Photograph Moya Nolan.

On this day five years ago, thousands of homeowners who had been encouraged to get on the property ladder while the market had collapsed were facing significantly higher property tax bills than the rest of the country, due to a valuation anomaly. 

First-time buyers who bought homes since 2013 found themselves at risk of falling into a valuation trap, according to the lead story in the Irish Examiner on August 8, 2015. 

First-time buyers who bought homes since 2013 found themselves at risk of falling into a valuation trap. Picture: PA
First-time buyers who bought homes since 2013 found themselves at risk of falling into a valuation trap. Picture: PA

In 2000, Irish Examiner readers were learning that bank customers whose account records do not tally with their tax returns will be called for an interview as part of a major operation launched by Revenue. Officials conducting the look-back audits to establish the banks’ liability for unpaid DIRT between 1986 and 1999 were also simultaneously gathering information on individual account holders involved in the massive scam to dodge DIRT. Anyone who ‘salted away’ hot money was to be named and shamed along with details of how the tax was evaded as part of an official publication under new Revenue rules. 

Elsewhere on the front page, gardaí in Kerry were concerned for a mother’s welfare after a stillborn baby was found on a beach in Rossbeigh. The discovery brought to mind the events of April 1984 when the body of an infant washed up in Cahersiveen, near to Rossbeigh. That discovery led to the 82-day high court tribunal in what became known as the ‘Kerry Babies’ case.

Fifty years ago, it was another familiar story as teachers were considering their role in marking exam papers. The Association of Secondary Teachers in Ireland (ASTI) balloted in favour of marking exam papers for the inter cert, now the junior cert. 

On the same day, the Cork Examiner also reported that a way had been cleared for a UN peacekeeping mission following a ceasefire in the Middle East. Israel and Egypt had agreed to a ceasefire, as proposed by the United States.

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