Mother of boys killed by their father fears Parole Bill is 'just sitting on a desk'

Under the Parole Bill the time a prisoner serving a life sentence must serve before they can appeal for parole would rise from seven years to 12 years. 
Mother of boys killed by their father fears Parole Bill is 'just sitting on a desk'
Kathleen Chada, mother of Eoghan and Ruairi Chada speaking at the Safe World Summit opening ceremony in 2018. Picture: Leah Farrell/RollingNews.ie

Kathleen Chada, the mother of two boys killed by their father almost seven years ago, has said she fears new legislation which would extend the jail term a prisoner must serve before they can seek parole, is “just sitting on a desk some where.” 

Her former husband Sanjeev Chada, was sentenced to life imprisonment in 2014 after driving his sons, Eoghan (10) and Ruairí (five), to Co Mayo before strangling them in late July 2013 and subsequently crashing his car.

Three weeks ago she was informed that he will be seeking parole and she has to make a submission to the parole board.

Under the Parole Bill the time a prisoner serving a life sentence must serve before they can appeal for parole would rise from seven years to 12 years. 

“The new law is sitting there since last July. It feels like it’s just sitting on a desk some where.” 

Ms Chada said she will have to write to the parole board stating why her ex husband should not get parole at this time. She said she could not avoid the process. 

“I can’t not. My biggest fear is that he will get out, otherwise it’s a complete farce.” 

The submission letter will also be read by her ex-husband. 

“He gets to read my submission, so am I writing to him or the parole board? I will outline in great detail what he did to the boys. He had absolutely no thought for others.

“This is somebody I now see as narcissistic, psychopathic. He hid this side of himself.

“I want to read his submission, why he thinks that after only seven years and the brutal murder of two children who loved him that he is entitled to parole.” 

Ms Chada said she is angry “that he feels entitled to move on with his life. It’s not about vengeance, but it is about justice, that the system is allowing him the right to consider leaving the walls of a prison.

“The Bill needs to be commenced, it needs to be a priority.”

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