PDForra not backing independent pay review model for military

PDForra, which represents more than 6,000 enlisted personnel in the Defence Forces, has broken ranks with officers' association, RACO, and is not advocating the setting up of an independent pay review body for the country's military.
PDForra not backing independent pay review model for military
PDForra General Secretary Ger Guinan (right). File photo.
PDForra General Secretary Ger Guinan (right). File photo.

PDForra, which represents more than 6,000 enlisted personnel in the Defence Forces, has broken ranks with officers' association, RACO, and is not advocating the setting up of an independent pay review body for the country's military.

RACO has called for such a body to be set up, similar to the British Armed Forces Pay Review Body (BAFPRB), and one used by the Australians.

However, PDForra general secretary Ger Guinan, has claimed the BAFPRB is not effective.

“While a permanent pay review body is being mooted for the Defence Forces the question has to be asked, if this model were so effective why are the BFPRB still reporting significant levels of dissatisfaction with pay amongst their personnel,” he said.

Mr Guinan pointed out the latest BFPRB report showed only 31% of respondents were satisfied with the outcome of BFPRB deliberations and recommendations.

They report recommendations on improving military pay and conditions to the British government, but the government doesn't have to implement them, which has happened in the past.

Mr Guinan said that like Ireland there is a significant amount of British departing the military for better-paid jobs in the private sector.

He said this is why his association is taking High Court action against the government to force it to allow PDForra to affiliate with the union umbrella body ICTU.

PDForra wants to do this so they have a voice at the bargaining table via ICTU at any national pay talks.

The government has been hesitating on granting the association the affiliation ever since February 2018 when the European Social Rights Committee (ESRC), a European legislative body, ruled that PDForra had the right to do this.

PDForra has also made a complaint to the ESRC about the government not adhering to the ruling.

The government has also been criticised for its stance by EUROMIL, the organisation which represents more than 500,000 servicemen and women in 22 European countries, many of which have already granted their military the right to union affiliation.

“Our association has long sought to associate with ICTU and were gladdened last year when our application to associate was accepted by Congress, subject to conclusion of talks with the Department of Defence,” Mr Guinan said.

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