Christian Brothers pay off debt to redress organisation

The Christian Brothers has paid the outstanding €6.37m owed to redress organisation Caranua, the fund set up to support people abused in residential institutions.

Christian Brothers pay off debt to redress organisation

The Christian Brothers has paid the outstanding €6.37m owed to redress organisation Caranua, the fund set up to support people abused in residential institutions.

Last July, the Irish Examiner revealed that Caranua would not have enough money to cover the cost of support for abuse survivors unless it “urgently” received money owed by the congregation

The State body, which closed for applications in August of 2018, supports survivors of residential abuse through contributions pledged by the religious congregations to the Residential Institutions Statutory Fund.

The order has now paid its final contribution to the fund through a series of monthly cash transfers received since September, the Department of Education and Skills confirmed today.

This follows a payment to the fund of €1.8m, made in September, bringing the Christian Brothers’ total contribution to the fund this year to €8.8m.

The latest instalment means the €110m pledged by the religious orders in voluntary contributions have been fully paid to the fund, said Education Minister Joe McHugh.

“These payments ensure that Caranua has access to the full €110m in cash contributions which were committed to,” said Mr McHugh.

Most importantly, the financial contributions will allow Caranua to continue its supports for survivors.

Almost 380 applications for funding supports were received by Caranua after it closed for applications in 2018.

As no more than €110m can be contributed to the fund, almost €429,000 of the Christian Brothers’ redress is to go towards the National Children’s Hospital.

Meanwhile, the Department of Education is refusing to put a timeframe on a further review of its redress scheme for survivors of abuse in national schools.

This is despite Mr McHugh indicating last month that he was due to receive draft proposals on an updated scheme from his officials, and that he understood the urgency involved.

“The department continues to engage closely with the Attorney General office on what is a complex piece of legal work,” said a spokesman for Mr McHugh.

The ex gratia scheme was set up in 2015 following a landmark ruling from the European Court of Human Rights in the case of Cork woman Louise O’Keeffe.

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