'I had a baby after cancer': Young mum named as face of Daffodil Day 2019

Sarah Murray, a mother-of-two and breast cancer survivor, is the face of the Irish Cancer Society's Daffodil Day.

'I had a baby after cancer': Young mum named as face of Daffodil Day 2019

Sarah Murray, a mother-of-two and breast cancer survivor, is the face of the Irish Cancer Society's Daffodil Day.

“I am a young mother who had a baby after cancer and I want to give a message of hope to other people affected by cancer,” she said.

The society needs to raise €4m on Daffodil Day, Friday, March 22, to meet the ever-increasing demand for support.

Sadie Murray, five, from Malahide Co Dublin at the launch of the Irish Cancer Society’s Daffodil Day, which takes place on March 22. Pictures: Andres Poveda
Sadie Murray, five, from Malahide Co Dublin at the launch of the Irish Cancer Society’s Daffodil Day, which takes place on March 22. Pictures: Andres Poveda

When Sarah, from Malahide, Co Dublin, was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2015 her immediate concern was whether or not she would be able to have another child.

She was not given the option of freezing her eggs because she needed to start chemotherapy immediately.

“Being diagnosed with breast cancer was a complete shock to me,” said Sarah who had noticed a swelling under her arm.

“I was doing a lot of training in the gym and assumed that I pulled a muscle or sprained something. It wasn't sore. I just casually mentioned it to my GP when I was there with my daughter getting her vaccinations.”

Sarah's GP sent her for an ultrasound and further tests revealed that she had early-stage breast cancer.

Treatment was tough and affected Sarah both physically and mentally: “I suffered a lot of depression and anxiety after the cancer. I would call the Freephone Cancer Nurseline for a chat because I knew they knew about cancer and understood what I was going through.

I also got a lot of support from the cancer nurses in the Daffodil Centre in Beaumont Hospital in Dublin. I used to have a chat with them on my way to chemotherapy.

Sarah got through her treatment and in 2017 decided to try for another baby. She put her reconstruction on hold and became pregnant.

Séan was born in June last year and his sister, Sadie, now aged five, loves having a little brother.

Breast cancer survivor Sarah Murray and her son Séan, who was born following her cancer treatment, are pictured with Minister for Health Simon Harris, Averil Power CEO of the Irish Cancer Society and Daff Man James Gilleran
Breast cancer survivor Sarah Murray and her son Séan, who was born following her cancer treatment, are pictured with Minister for Health Simon Harris, Averil Power CEO of the Irish Cancer Society and Daff Man James Gilleran

Sarah said her son, now aged seven months, is a healthy and happy little boy who is always smiling.

“If I can help anyone who is going through what I went through – give them a bit of hope or a bit of help, I am happy to do it in any way I can.”

At today's launch of the society's 32nd Daffodil Day in Dublin its chief executive, Averil Power, spoke of the need to raise funds to reach more people in need of their services:

Last year our nurses, staff and volunteers reached thousands of patients affected by cancer, but we did not reach everyone in need. As 98% of our funding comes from the public, we simply can't do that without more donations.

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