Staycations 2020: Take your pick from these great things to do in Ulster

Cross rope bridges strung across the Atlantic or visit reimagining of time gone by; whatever you fancy doing, you’ll find it in Ulster.
Staycations 2020: Take your pick from these great things to do in Ulster
Probably the most famous Game of Thrones filming location in Northern Ireland, Castle Ward is the location of Winterfell.

Cross rope bridges strung across the Atlantic or visit reimagining of time gone by; whatever you fancy doing, you’ll find it in Ulster.

Ulster Folk Museum

The Ulster American Folk Park is an open-air museum in Castletown, just outside Omagh, in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.
The Ulster American Folk Park is an open-air museum in Castletown, just outside Omagh, in County Tyrone, Northern Ireland.

At this immersive museum in County Down, a life in the early 20th century has been recreated in a purpose-built town, where people in period dress go about their business, just as they would have 100 years ago.

Titanic Belfast

The world’s largest Titanic Visitor experience, Titanic Belfast spreads out over six floors.
The world’s largest Titanic Visitor experience, Titanic Belfast spreads out over six floors.

The world’s largest Titanic Visitor experience, Titanic Belfast spreads out over six floors of interpretive and interactive galleries, all dedicated to recreating the sights, sounds and experiences on board Titanic.

You’ll learn about Belfast at the turn of the century and experience a thrilling ride through the reconstruction of the shipyard and Titanic under construction.

Finally, you’ll walk the decks of SS Nomadic, the last remaining White Star Line vessel.

The Dark Hedges, Ballymoney

The Dark Hedges is widely photographed likely thanks to its starring role in Game of Thrones.
The Dark Hedges is widely photographed likely thanks to its starring role in Game of Thrones.

Planted in the eighteenth century by the Stuart family, this stunning avenue of beech trees was constructed as an impressive entrance to their family home.

Widely photographed, likely thanks to its starring role in Game of Thrones, season one as Arya’s escape route along the Kingsroad.

Lough Neagh

Gulls and Terns over Lough Neagh. Picture: Geray Sweeney/CORBIS
Gulls and Terns over Lough Neagh. Picture: Geray Sweeney/CORBIS

As the largest freshwater lake in Ireland and the UK, containing over 800 billion gallons of water, Lough Neagh attracts water enthusiasts from all over the country.

Giant’s Causeway

Giant’s Causeway is a collection of 40,000 interlocking basalt columns dating back almost 60 million years.
Giant’s Causeway is a collection of 40,000 interlocking basalt columns dating back almost 60 million years.

Jutting out over the wild seascape of our northern shores, the Giant’s Causeway is a collection of 40,000 interlocking basalt columns dating back almost 60 million years.

There are lots of walks that flank the causeway, but the view here is worth the trip alone.

Marble Arch Caves

The Marble Arch Caves are home to a stunning show cave in Fermanagh is home to hidden rivers and winding passages.
The Marble Arch Caves are home to a stunning show cave in Fermanagh is home to hidden rivers and winding passages.

This stunning show cave in Fermanagh is home to hidden rivers, winding passages and lofty cave structures that beg to be explored.

Bushmills Distillery

The Old Bushmills Distillery, the oldest licensed whiskey distillery in the world. Picture: Paul Faith/PA
The Old Bushmills Distillery, the oldest licensed whiskey distillery in the world. Picture: Paul Faith/PA

Bushmills Irish Whiskey is made at the world's oldest licenced working distillery in County Antrim.

The Bushmills Brand Experience includes a fascinating guided tour around the distillery.

Malin Head

Malin Head is both the start and the end of the Wild Atlantic Way.
Malin Head is both the start and the end of the Wild Atlantic Way.

Situated on the most northerly tip of Ireland on the Inishowen Peninsula in Donegal, Malin Head is both the start and the end of the Wild Atlantic Way, offering epic scenery and historical sites.

Dunluce Castle

Dunluce Castle in County Antrim is a living testament to centuries of turbulent history. Picture: Tarquin Blake
Dunluce Castle in County Antrim is a living testament to centuries of turbulent history. Picture: Tarquin Blake

Like many castles of its ilk, Dunluce Castle in County Antrim is a living testament to centuries of turbulent history.

Clinging to a cliffside, the earliest written records of the castle date back to 1513 when it was the seat of the McQuillan family.

Over the next two centuries it was seized by the McDonnells until it fell at the hands of Queen Elizabeth 1.

Carrick-a-Rede

Traditionally fishermen erected the bridge to Carrick-a-Rede island over a 23m-deep and 20m-wide chasm to check their salmon nets. Today visitors are drawn here simply to take the rope bridge challenge!
Traditionally fishermen erected the bridge to Carrick-a-Rede island over a 23m-deep and 20m-wide chasm to check their salmon nets. Today visitors are drawn here simply to take the rope bridge challenge!

A rope bridge hitched to cliffs across the Atlantic Ocean in County Antrim, Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge is one of the most exhilarating visitor experiences in Ulster.

Suspended almost 100 ft above sea level, the bridge was first erected by salmon fishermen over 250 years ago.

Seamus Heaney Home Place

Late poet and Nobel Laureate, Seamus Heaney
Late poet and Nobel Laureate, Seamus Heaney

A must-visit for fans of Heaney, this purpose built arts and literary centre in Bellaghy, Derry, celebrates the life and work of the late poet and Nobel Laureate, Seamus Heaney.

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