Scene and Heard: 'the major voice of a generation'

Festival season approaches, legends come to the Opera House, and a young Irish phenomenon continues to impact on UK telly, writes Arts Editor Des O'Driscoll.

Scene and Heard: 'the major voice of a generation'

Festival season approaches, legends come to the Opera House, and a young Irish phenomenon continues to impact on UK telly, writes Arts Editor Des O'Driscoll.

GIG-WISE:

Kate Tempest, the multi-faceted British spoken-word artist, has been announced for the Everyman in Cork as part of the city’s Midsummer Festival, on June 15. It’s a guaranteed sell-out, so if you are tempted, get in soon.

Further east, All Together Now (July 31 – Aug 3) released much of its line-up for the Co Waterford event. Definitely aiming for the sort of demographic who feel Electric Picnic is ‘gone too young’, headliners include Iggy Pop, Lauryn Hill, Jarvis Cocker and Groove Armada.

Other announcements this week included Stone Roses vocalist Ian Brown embarking on a tour that will include several Irish dates, including Cork Opera House on May 15, as well as Limerick, Galway and Dublin. The National Concert Hall has also lined up two interesting gigs: Laurie Anderson has two shows at the Dublin venue (March 28 and 29), which will incorporate her output as a multi-media artist; while jazz legend Brad Mehldau plays on November 1.

In Cork, Sea Church in Ballycotton launches this weekend with gigs from the Frank and Walters, and Lisa Hannigan, while Plug’d at the Roundy hosts contemporary cellist Kevin Murphy tomorrow night.

FILM TIPS:

Cork French Film festival begins on Wednesday, with an impressive roster of mostly-modern offerings at the Gate Cinema over five days. In Dublin, the capital’s ownfestival of cinema continues, and anybody with an interest in gender issues may brave some of the segments of the 14-hour Women Make Film. Tilda Swinton, Jane Fonda and Thandie Newton are among the contributors to this alternative take on the history of cinema.

In general cinemas this weekend, Mark Ruffalo stars in Dark Waters, the true tale of a lawyer who takes on a case against the DuPont chemical company; while Elisabeth Moss has been winning plenty praise for her role in the updated version of The Invisible Man.

ON THE TELLY:

With the adaptation of Sally Rooney’s (above) Normal People hitting BBC Three in April, the British broadcaster has also announced a 12-part adaptation of the Irish author’s debut novel,Conversations with Friends. Both series are a massive endorsement of the 29-year-old Mayo woman’s status as one of the major voices of her generation. There has been no official word from RTÉ yet on plans to show Normal People, but the Lenny Abrahamson-directed show is expected to pop up on the station at some stage.

In the meantime, film options next week include Maudie, on TG4 on Monday, directed by Aisling Walsh, who will be at the Fastnet Film Festival in May. Also, Castle Rock on RTÉ2 from Wednesday looks like a promising take on life in Stephen King’s world.

VISUAL ART & THEATRE NIGHTS:

Anyone in London over the next few days may be interested in catching Fáinleog, an exhibition of Irish art at the Irish Cultural Centre in Hammersmith. The collection of work by three artists — Eve Parnell, Frances Breen, and Laura O’Hagan — has been named after the swallow, and addresses themes of emigration and the environment.

There’s also a London connection to the current exhibition at the Crawford in Cork, with the Artists’ Film International (AFI) project originally established by the Whitechapel Gallery. The selection of moving image works from 22 international artists is being shown on a loop at the gallery.

THEATRE NIGHTS: Upcoming plays at the Everyman in Cork include Watt by Samuel Beckett, starring Barry McGovern, on March 10-12. In Dublin, the Abbey currently has ensemble comedy The Fall of the Second Republic.

More in this section