Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners revealed

The winners of the prestigious competition have been announced at the Natural History Museum in London. Here are some of the top picks from several of the categories, including two for young photographers.

Wildlife Photographer of the Year winners revealed

The winners of the prestigious competition have been announced at the Natural History Museum in London. Wildlife Photographer of the Year is developed and produced by the Natural History Museum, London. The 100 finalists will be exhibited until May 31.

Here are some of the top picks from several of the categories, including two for young photographers.

The moment’ by Yongqing Bao, China

‘The moment’ by Yongqing Bao, China. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.
‘The moment’ by Yongqing Bao, China. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.

‘The moment’ by Yongqing Bao, China, was the Grand Title Winner of the Natural History Museum of London’s Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition for 2019. The photograph, taken on the alpine meadowland of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, in China’s Qilian Mountains National Nature Reserve, features a marmot startled by an attacking fox.

The Equal Match, by Ingo Arndt, Germany

The Equal Match, by Ingo Arndt, Germany, joint winner in Behaviour: Mammals: A puma attacks a guanaco in the Torres del Paine region of Patagonia, Chile. To record the attack, Arndt had to be facing both prey and puma and be positioned downwind, facing the likely direction the puma would come from.

To monitor her movements when she was out of his sight, he positioned his two trackers so they could keep watch with binoculars and radio Ingo as the female approached her prey. Despite leaping on the guanaco’s back after this picture was taken, the puma failed to kill her, and just missed a kick that could have injured it.

Humming Surprise, by Thomas Easterbrook

Humming Surprise, by Thomas Easterbrook. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.
Humming Surprise, by Thomas Easterbrook. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.

Humming Surprise, by Thomas Easterbrook, UK, winner 10 Years and Under: While on holiday in France, Thomas was in the garden when he heard the sound from the fast-beating wings of the hummingbird hawk moth, a species also found in Ireland. He managed to snap it feeding on nectar from autumn sage, with its long proboscis.

Another Barred Migrant, by Alejandro Prieto

Another Barred Migrant, by Alejandro Prieto, Mexico. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.
Another Barred Migrant, by Alejandro Prieto, Mexico. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.

Another Barred Migrant, by Alejandro Prieto, Mexico, winner Wildlife Photojournalism: Single Image: This is not an actual animal — it’s a projection of a jaguar onto a section of the US-Mexico border fence.

A ban on hunting in 1997 failed to halt their decline in the US, and Donald Trump’s fence further reduces chances of re-establishing a breeding population. The shot was created to highlight the disastrous effects of on wildlife of a barrier between Mexico and the US.

The rat pack by Charlie Hamilton James

The rat pack by Charlie Hamilton James, UK. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.
The rat pack by Charlie Hamilton James, UK. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.

The rat pack by Charlie Hamilton James, UK, Winner Urban Wildlife: Hamilton lit his shot to blend with the glow of the street lights, and operated his kit remotely. Taken on Pearl Street, in New York’s Lower Manhattan, the ancestors of these adaptable brown rats probably crossed the Atlantic on boats with humans.

Show Time, by Jasper Doest

Show Time, by Jasper Doest, Netherlands. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.
Show Time, by Jasper Doest, Netherlands. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.

Show Time, by Jasper Doest, Netherlands, winner Wildlife Photojournalist Story Award: This picture, part of a multi-photo story, was taken at a comedy show at a theatre north of Tokyo.

These highly popular shows, which attract both locals and tourists, derive from Sarumawashi (translated as ‘monkey dancing’) – a traditional Japanese performance art. This particular macaque was originally legally captured in the wild, and was finally retired from performing last year after 17 years.

The Architectural Army, by Daniel Kronauer

The Architectural Army, by Daniel Kronauer, USA. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.
The Architectural Army, by Daniel Kronauer, USA. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.

The Architectural Army, by Daniel Kronauer, USA, winner Behaviour: Invertebrates: Taken in a rainforest in Costa Rica, the ants would use their bodies to build a new daytime nest (bivouac) to house the queen and larvae.

They would form a scaffold of vertical chains by interlocking claws on their feet and then create a network of chambers and tunnels into which the larvae and queen would be moved from the last bivouac.

Night Glow, by Cruz Erdmann

Night Glow, by Cruz Erdmann, New Zealand. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.
Night Glow, by Cruz Erdmann, New Zealand. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London.

Night Glow, by Cruz Erdmann, New Zealand, winner of 11-14 Years Old category and overall winner of Young Wildlife Photographer of the Year: Cruz’s portrait of an iridescent bigfin reef squid was captured on a night dive in the Lembeh Strait off North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

Cruz gained his diving certification at the age of ten. One of the judges described the picture as “a resounding achievement for such a young photographer”.

Land of the Eagle, by Audun Rikardsen

Land of the Eagle by Audun Rikardsen. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London
Land of the Eagle by Audun Rikardsen. Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2019 - Natural History Museum, London

Land of the Eagle, by Audun Rikardsen, Norway, winner Behaviour: Birds: High on a ledge, on the coast near his home in northern Norway, Rikardsen positioned an old tree branch that he hoped would make a perfect golden eagle lookout.

To this he bolted a tripod head with a camera, flashes and motion sensor attached, and built himself a hide nearby. Over the next three years, an eagle got used to the camera and Rikardsen eventually got his shot.

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