On this day 169 years ago Queen Victoria landed on Ireland's famine-stricken soil

In 1849, during the Great Famine, Queen Victoria traveled to Ireland for an 11-day visit to Cork, Dublin, and Belfast and received a warm welcome by the Irish people.

On this day 169 years ago Queen Victoria landed on Ireland's famine-stricken soil

In 1849, during the Great Famine, Queen Victoria traveled to Ireland for an 11-day visit to Ireland and received a surprisingly warm welcome by the Irish people.

Although an estimated one million people died from disease and starvation and over a million more had fled to America on coffin ships, Queen Victoria was met with enthusiasm and cheering crowds when she visited.

Many banners at the time even read, “Hail Victoria, Ireland's hope and England's glory.”

Today marks 169 years since her visit on August 2, 1849 when she visited citizens of Cork, Dublin and Belfast.

In tribute to the Queen's visit to Cobh, which at the time was named Cove, the Cork town was renamed 'Queenstown', though it was changed again to 'Cobh' after Irish independence.

Paul Lynch who wrote about Queen Victoria for the Irish Times, called it “one of the inconvenient ironies of the Famine period".

He reported that Queen Victoria “gave the royal party a rapturous welcome".

In her diary, the young queen at the time wrote about her travels:

“Cork is not all like an English town… the crowd is a noisy, excitable but a very good-natured one, running and pushing about, and laughing, talking and shrieking. The beauty of the women is very remarkable… such beautiful dark eyes and hair, and such fine teeth…”

Jump 169 years forward and people are remembering the historic day.

-Digital Desk

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