Fans will not be disappointed, says Julie Andrews

Julie Andrews has promised concert-goers they will not feel “shortchanged” by her performing comeback which will see the legend return to the UK stage for the first time in 30 years.

Julie Andrews has promised concert-goers they will not feel “shortchanged” by her performing comeback which will see the legend return to the UK stage for the first time in 30 years.

The 74-year-old star, whose famous voice was damaged 12 years ago after surgery to remove non-cancerous nodules on her vocal cords, said she would not be blasting out songs from 'The Sound of Music'.

But the singer said she will have the backing of five guests and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

Following the operation, the Mary Poppins star sued the New York surgeons and won €674,000 in an out-of-court settlement.

The concert at London’s O2 will include hits from 'The Sound Of Music', 'The King And I', 'South Pacific' and 'Carousel' with an ensemble of West End and Broadway stars.

The star told The Lady magazine that the O2 arena audience would not be disappointed by the concert on May 8 next year.

Andrews said: “There will be five guests and a full symphony orchestra, the Royal Philharmonic, with 82 musicians if you please.

“So I don’t think the audience is going to be shortchanged in any way by me not singing full blast 'The Sound of Music' or something like that, which I won’t be doing.”

She also played down suggestions that the operation she underwent was the only reason for her change in vocal range.

She told the magazine: “Even if I hadn’t had the throat surgery, I wouldn’t be able to do that these days.”

Andrews also indicated to the magazine that Britain could lose her to the United States for good, saying: “(I’m) beginning to consider US citizenship, although I still have my British passport.”

She also gave her take on the 'The X Factor' phenomenon.

Dame Julie told the magazine: “Isn’t it a glorified form of talent show, isn’t it vaudeville? It’s what we used to do, touring all over the place. Poor Joe (the eventual winner Joe McElderry) has to do it in front of millions and millions of people on TV and get it right, instead of touring around the country, and honing his craft.”

:: The full interview appears in a double edition of The Lady, out today. The magazine is re-launching with a return to its original typeface, as it prepares for its 125th anniversary in February 2010.

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