Gilmour pays tribute to Wright at Q Awards

David Gilmour hinted that he would stop playing some of Pink Floyd's best-known compositions as he paid tribute to keyboard player Richard Wright today.

David Gilmour hinted that he would stop playing some of Pink Floyd's best-known compositions as he paid tribute to keyboard player Richard Wright today.

Gilmour, 62, dedicated his Outstanding Contribution to Music title at the Q Awards to the Pink Floyd founder member, who died last month from cancer.

He said there was music that he would not be able to play without Wright.

Gilmour also expressed his disappointment that Pink Floyd were not able to perform at Glastonbury.

The band were said to have been snubbed by festival organiser Michael Eavis following their offer to play there this year.

The Pink Floyd songwriter, vocalist and guitarist said it had been one of Wright's wishes, before he died at the age of 65, to play at Glastonbury.

Gilmour told an audience of stars, including Coldplay, Keane, Grace Jones, Tom Jones, and Massive Attack: "I'm going to dedicate this, if you don't mind, to my old friend and colleague Richard Wright who died a couple of weeks ago, (and) with whom I had worked for 40-odd years now.

"That's now come to an end. There's all sorts of music that I will not be able to play again without him. That's a source of sadness for me.

"One of the last things he wanted to do in this last year was a big outdoor festival such as Glastonbury.

"We weren't able to do that due to all sorts of reasons which is, again, a sadness."

Gilmour said: "He deserves this as much as I do. You could say that he was in the position of second fiddle, slightly behind some of the pushier chaps in the front. But his work was mighty important to our entire careers."

Asked afterwards whether he was not going to perform songs that Wright had helped compose, he said "Maybe", adding: "I want to leave it at that."

Wright wrote music for classic Pink Floyd albums such as 'The Dark Side Of The Moon' and 'Wish You Were Here'.

'The Great Gig In The Sky', and 'Us And Them', both from 1973's 'Dark Side Of The Moon' album, were his best-known compositions.

He also made essential contributions to 'Atom Heart Mother', 'Echoes' and 'Shine On You Crazy Diamond', the tribute to former band member Syd Barrett.

The Q Awards saw Coldplay walk away with two gongs, for Best Album and Best Act in the World Today.

They took Best Album for 'Viva La Vida Or Death And All His Friends'.

Meat Loaf, who won the Q Classic Song for 'Bat Out Of Hell', made a bizarre appearance on stage when he appeared to almost fall over.

A spokesman for the star said he had been suffering from vertigo.

Alan Carr replaced Jonathan Ross as the host of this year's awards, voted for by Q magazine readers.

The butt of his jokes included Coldplay, Keira Knightley, George Michael and Amy Winehouse.

He told the audience: "Coldplay are more rock and roll than you think. You should have seen the state of their suite. Have you tried getting tofu out of their sheets?"

Of Knightley, he said she had been sunbathing on Highgate Hill but was "so pale and thin, she'd only been stretched out for five minutes when Amy Winehouse snorted her".

The Last Shadow Puppets, a side project of Arctic Monkey Alex Turner, was named Best New Act.

Duffy beat Adele to the Breakthrough Artist gong but was not at today's ceremony.

Grace Jones stole the limelight in a bizarre hooded outfit, which included a mask with "horns" with tiny lights on the tips.

Jones, who was presented with the Q Idol award, said: "Lazarus came back from the dead... I've just been on holiday."

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