BBC rapped for 'racist' Iggy Pop comment

The BBC has been rapped by Ofcom over a Glastonbury Festival interview in which rock star Iggy Pop referred to a "Paki shop".

The BBC has been rapped by Ofcom over a Glastonbury Festival interview in which rock star Iggy Pop referred to a "Paki shop".

The singer made his comments to presenters Jo Whiley and Mark Radcliffe during a live studio chat on BBC2 after finishing his headline set.

As part of a rambling anecdote about his clothes, he said: "The beauty of being me is that you can wear expensive clobber and you can walk down Camden High Street at a Paki shop..."

Neither presenter acknowledged his remarks or made an on-air apology, although the BBC issued an apology the following day.

Media watchdog Ofcom received two complaints from viewers who saw the interview in the early hours of June 24.

The BBC said the US singer was probably unaware that a term commonly used 30 years ago had now passed out of "polite usage".

It added: "Iggy Pop is one of the wildest men in rock music and, as such, he has a built-in content advisory warning."

But Ofcom found the BBC in breach of the broadcasting code on offensive material.

"The broadcaster failed in its responsibility to ensure that the offence caused was justified by the context, for example by lessening it through issuing an on-air apology as soon as possible after the incident occurred."

Robson Green drama 'Wire In The Blood' breached TV guidelines by showing sadistic scenes of a man about to be decapitated by a machete.

The scenes were shown in the opening moments of the July 18 episode, before the title credits and just after 9pm.

Three viewers complained that the scenes were too close to the watershed.

Ofcom said that the ITV1 drama followed 'The Bill', which counts children among its audience, and it was likely some of those children were still watching when the offending scenes were shown.

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