Oasis brothers invited to join Gallagher record bid

Organisers of a world record attempt are hoping rock star brothers Liam and Noel Gallagher will join them in Ireland this week as their ancestral clan unites for a colossal get-together.

Organisers of a world record attempt are hoping rock star brothers Liam and Noel Gallagher will join them in Ireland this week as their ancestral clan unites for a colossal get-together.

More than 10,000 emails and letters have been sent around the world inviting Gallaghers to Co Donegal on Saturday for the latest international same-surname gathering.

The Oasis duo have been asked to attend but the man behind the massive family do is remaining tight lipped about the rock stars.

“We’ve invited a couple of boys from Manchester, and that’s all I’m saying,” organiser Adrian Gallagher said.

The aim of the Gallagher Global Gathering is to beat the record set by the Welsh last year when 1,224 Joneses turned up to an event in Cardiff.

“It’s not a matter of keeping up with the Joneses, it’s a question of beating them,” Mr Gallagher said.

Chairman of the gathering, Donegal priest Father Sean O’Gallachoir, joked when told of the current record: “I could get that in the parish.”

Over the last two and a half years, emails have been sent to Irish groups in Canada, Australia and the US, more than 8,500 letters have been sent to the UK and 2,000 around Ireland.

The Gallagher quest also reached international airwaves including an interview on Japanese radio while American broadcasters ABC are planning to film the event.

“The Japanese like the idea of family and culture because some people over there think they are beginning to loose the connected part of their culture,” Mr Gallagher said.

Gallagher, originally a name associated with the north-west of Ireland, has spread around the world and the clan can trace its roots back to the legendary Irish king Niall Of The Nine Hostages.

The first Gallagher arrived from Brazil last weekend and the next to make it to Donegal was a man from Vancouver, Canada, and a woman from Queensland, Australia.

Thanks to centuries and decades of Irish emigration there are more than 30 variations of the name including Gaeilge (Irish) spellings and Anglicised versions, but all are welcome.

“Things got lost slightly in translation,” Mr Gallagher said.

He also offered an insight into just how common the name Gallagher is. The first Irish ’GI bride’ was a Gallagher while more controversially the first stone thrower in Derry was also a Gallagher.

“But that was in 1608 I’m reliably informed,” he joked.

An official from the Guinness Book of Records and two independent people will be on hand to verify the gathering.

Gallaghers must bring photo identification, a passport or driving licence or a birth certificate to take part.

Women born Gallagher but who have since married must bring their birth certificates to take part and youngsters must bring a letter of permission from their parents.

The gathering is planned for Letterkenny Institute of Technology on Sunday afternoon and dozens of events are planned for the following week.

Further details are available from www.gallagherclan.org.

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