Star-struck May hands in thesis after 30 years

Queen guitarist Brian May finally handed in his completed thesis today – more than 30 years after he began writing the academic paper.

Queen guitarist Brian May finally handed in his completed thesis today – more than 30 years after he began writing the academic paper.

In 1974, when Queen was in its infancy, May decided to abandon his studies for a doctorate to focus on the band.

But last year, the rock star decided to fish out his unfinished work on interplanetary dust clouds.

The 48,000-word tome, Radial Velocities in the Zodiacal Dust Cloud, was stored in the loft of his home in Surrey.

The 60-year-old composer dedicated nine months to further research at Imperial College in London, the university where he originally studied.

Today he handed in the thesis at the university, and said: “It feels very exciting.

“I will have two experts in the field who will now grill me and probably give me hell.

“But I have a philosophical view of things, a stoical view of life, that it will be what it will be. I’ve done the work and I’m proud of the work.

“I’ve been used to getting my own way but with this I had to buckle down and be a student and do what I was told. I did a lot of scratching my head.

“I’ve had a really great time here, everyone treated me like a normal person.

“It was hard work. At the beginning I did work through the night as I’ve always been a person that likes working through the night. I didn’t sleep very much.

“But in the last few days I’ve just been reading it through looking for typing errors. It’s been under control.”

May had already received a physics degree at the university before he spent three years working on his thesis from 1971.

If assessors approve the work, which shows that dust clouds in the solar system are moving in the same direction as the planets, the famous guitarist will finally receive his PhD in August next year.

Last month, the astronomy expert received an honorary doctorate at Exeter University.

He also recently co-authored a children’s science book with astronomer Sir Patrick Moore.

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