Hothouse flowers to support Bryan Adams at open-air gig

The Hothouse Flowers will join Canadian rocker Bryan Adams for a major open air concert in Galway on the June Bank Holiday weekend.

The Hothouse Flowers will join Canadian rocker Bryan Adams for a major open air concert in Galway on the June Bank Holiday weekend.

The Irish band, known for the song Don’t Go, will be special guests at the Bryan Adams gig on June 4th as part of the Tribe Vibe music festival.

Also on the bill for Pearse Stadium concert are another Irish band, The Stunning.

The Canadian rocker has sold over 50 million albums in a career that has spanned over 20 years.

Adams holds the record for the longest running number one single in the UK with (Everything I Do) I Do It For You, the theme song for the 1991 film Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves.

His hits include Summer of ‘69, Heaven and Have You Ever Really Loved A Woman?.

Hothouse Flowers, headed by Liam O’Maonlai, went from busking on the streets of Dublin in 1985 to attracting the attention and help of Bono and U2’s Mother Records on the strength of their early single, Love Don’t Work this Way.

The next decade took them on a worldwide tour with their hit singles, Don’t Go, and their version of, I Can See Clearly Now, along with several albums including their debut, People.

The band released their latest album, Into Your Heart, in 2004, with the first single, Tell Me, reaching the Top 20 on the Irish charts.

Hothouse Flowers have toured extensively in support of the record, with a performance at the Glastonbury Festival in 2004.

Tickets for the Sunday gig priced €49.50 including booking free are available from www.ticketlord.com.

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