Knopfler latest celebrity motorcycle crash victim

Dire Straits frontman Mark Knopfler is just one of many celebrities who has been badly injured in a motorcycle accident.

Dire Straits frontman Mark Knopfler is just one of many celebrities who has been badly injured in a motorcycle accident.

The 49-year-old broke six ribs and his collar bone yesterday when his Honda bike was involved in a collision with a Fiat Punto car in London.

Irish actor heartthrob Liam Neeson nearly died after a crash in July 2000, just north of New York City in the US.

He had left his actress wife Natasha Richardson and their two sons, aged six and nine, at home in Washington while he went to pick up some muffins and a newspaper.

Returning home on his Springer Softtail motorcycle, a deer ran into the road and collided with Neeson who drove straight into a tree.

The Hollywood actor suffered a smashed pelvis and serious bleeding, but eventually made a full recovery.

Matrix star Keanu Reeves has a history of motorcycle accidents, including one as a teenager which ruptured his spleen and broke several ribs.

In 1997, he was on crutches for weeks after he was involved in an accident in Los Angeles while riding his much-loved Norton bike.

Reeves was reported to have delayed the filming of the Matrix sequel after he broke his ankle in yet another accident in January 2001.

Movie muscleman Arnold Schwarzenegger, 55, who starred in the Terminator films, fractured several ribs in a motorcycle accident in November 2001 and was admitted to St John’s Hospital in Santa Monica.

Bob Dylan, now 61, broke neck vertebrae in 1966 when he had a serious accident on his Triumph motorbike in Woodstock, New York.

Heather Mills, 37, the second wife of Sir Paul McCartney, has also fallen foul of the two-wheeled machine.

In 1993, during her modelling days, she was involved in a collision with a policeman on a motorbike and had to have her leg amputated.

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