Writer defends white Tilda Swinton character in Doctor Strange

The writer of Doctor Strange has defended the film from accusations of “whitewashing” over the casting of TILDA SWINTON as a traditionally Tibetan character.
Writer defends white Tilda Swinton character in Doctor Strange

The British actress plays the Ancient One in the new superhero movie — a role depicted as an elderly Tibetan man in the 1960s Marvel comics.

Writer Jon Spaihts said the film, which stars BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH in the title role, had to address some of the “dated” stereotypes from the original stories.

Spaihts told the Press Association: “We were wrestling with the fact that some of the core characters of the Doctor Strange mythos were created in the early 60s and they are dated.

“They represent, to some extent, stereotypes which we had to find ways to freshen up.

“The Ancient One we’ve reinvented as a woman, a woman of Western extraction in this film.

“I will say there’s almost a Tilda Swinton exemption because I think she could play any role she wants. I think she’s sublime in this film. One of the best actors living.”

Actresses CAREY MULLIGAN, JULIET STEVENSON, JOELY RICHARDSON and her mother VANESSA REDGRAVE have laid down the law in a rousing reading of asylum legislation in a last plea to the Government to help child refugees in Calais.

The Young Vic theatre in London hosted the poignant performance of the Dublin III regulation, which sets out a child’s right to claim asylum, in a production called Last Chance.

It was standing room only as those keen to understand more about the intricacies of the law, and drawn by the big acting names, packed out the studio space.

The performance covered articles of the regulation including guarantees for minors, family procedure and obligations of the member state responsible - and none of those taking part had read the legislation beforehand or rehearsed it.

TOM CRUISE gave newcomer DANIKA YAROSH a dictionary during her first week on the set of new movie Jack Reacher: Never Go Back, the rookie actress said.

The 18-year-old, appearing in her first major film role as tearaway Sam Dayton, said the veteran Top Gun star took her “under his wing” on set.

Speaking at the film’s European premiere, the American teenager said Cruise also “took it upon himself” to be her teacher — and gave her tips on how to execute stunts without getting hurt.

She told the Press Association: “The first week on set he actually gave me this big dictionary with everything I ever wanted to know about film.

“It was a dictionary specific for film, so if I was ever on set and something was said that I didn’t understand but didn’t want to ask, I could just look it up no problem.

“He taught me about everyone on set, what their roles were, and how they contributed to the film.”

She added: “He taught me all about stunts so if he was ever doing a big stunt that I wasn’t part of he had me sit next to the camera so I could watch him do it in real life and see how you see it on camera. It was a masterclass from the best.”

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