Rauch strikes gold with new spreading pattern

Rauch has won an Agritechnica gold medal for its Axmat automatic spreading pattern adjustment of a twin disc fertiliser spreader.
Rauch strikes gold with new spreading pattern

The award also goes to Grimme Landmaschinenfabrik of Germany for its technology to separate out stones and clods of earth in potato harvesting.

The first time electro-hybrid telehandler for agricultural use is also a winner, along with an online simulator on which machinery operators can be trained to operate a complex harvesting machine or tractor through a personal computer.

Experts have conferred gold medals for innovation on four of the 393 innovations submitted for Agritechnica 2013, the world’s largest exhibition for agricultural machinery and equipment.

They selected 33 innovations for silver medal awards.

Agritechnica takes place in Hanover, Germany, Nov 12-16, 2013. The event has become one of the most important for presenting new farm machinery and equipment.

*Separating out stones and clods of earth in potato harvesting has been tackled by Grimme Landmaschinenfabrik of Germany.

Especially with multi-row harvesters, the existing mechanical separation methods frequently cause a bottleneck.

With the AirSep pneumatic impurities separator, the potatoes are kept gently floating above a vibrating perforated conveyor base, thanks to an uplift air stream flowing through from below.

The stones and clods of earth are heavier, and drop down and are passed to a removal belt.

The quality and performance of separation can be infinitely adjusted from the tractor to suit the material being harvested, by altering the combination of air flow rate and the inclination and frequency of the conveyor base.

The manufacturers claim this technology enables potato cropping on fields that would otherwise need costly preparation before sowing.

*Rauch has won an Agritechnica gold medal for its Axmat automatic spreading pattern adjustment of a twin disc fertiliser spreader.

An arm fitted with microwave sensors swivels about the discs and identifies the spread fan, It then sets the spreading pattern automatically to the desired working width. It adjusts for the fertiliser granule type being used and for changes in weather conditions. also.

The spreading pattern is permanently monitored during spreading, and the fertiliser delivery point is automatically readjusted.

The automatic self-setting of the spreader allows higher precision compared to conventional setting practices, without requiring a spreading test on the field.

It improves fertiliser efficiency, reduces emissions and fertiliser costs, and protects yields.

Initial results at the Irestea French test institute have confirmed the advantages of the system.

*For the first time, an electro-hybrid telehandler is being offered for agricultural use.

This allows emission-free electric drive in closed buildings, and a diesel engine powers the hydraulics and an electricity generator outdoors.

The Merlo Hybrid telehandler has won an Agritechnica 2013 gold medal for innovation.

In the electric mode, the 30 kWh lithium battery supplies the machine with energy.

It works quietly and emission-free, and can thus also be used in closed buildings.

In the hybrid mode, the diesel engine supplies the power for traction drive and charges the battery at the same time.

This system makes it possible to halve the rated output of the diesel engine without restricting the work of the loader.

During the low-load or idling phases that frequently occur in telehandler use, the drive can be powered electrically only, so fuel costs and carbon emissions from the downsized engine can be reduced s much as 30%.

*Machinery operators can be trained to operate a complex harvesting machine or tractor through a personal computer, thanks to the online simulator which has won an Agritechnica 2013 gold medal for innovation for Claas of Germany.

It allows the complete working behaviour of a machine under a wide variety of conditions to be mapped dynamically on a PC interface for the first time.

This allows optimal training , making it possible to substantially boost the technical potential of machinery during the first days of use for harvesting.

Operating faults and damage to machinery can also be reduced, as new drivers are familiarised quickly with a machine.

Experienced drivers can refresh their knowledge through regular training, and continuously improve their performance potential.

Considerable savings in cost and time can be achieved from day one, through better handling of expensive harvesting machinery.

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