Here's what was chosen as Ireland's favourite sport in 2018

Gaelic games are now the country's favourite sport, according to a new survey.

The Teneo Sport and Sponsorship Index for 2018 was released today and GAA has overtaken soccer as the most popular sport in Ireland.

GAA earned 21% in the vote with soccer getting 19%. Rugby was third with 14%.

While rugby is behind the two other mainstream sports, Irish rugby features highly in Ireland's favourite moments of 2018.

 

Johnny Sexton's drop goal against France in the Six Nations was voted the most memorable sporting moment, getting 31% in the survey.

The women's hockey team beating Spain in the World Cup semi-final was second (21%) while Conor McGregor tapping out against Khabib Nurmagomedov was third (15%).

Jacob Stockdale's try against New Zealand in November (13%) and Nickie Quaid's save against Cork for Limerick in the All-Ireland semi-final (6%) coming in fourth and fifth.

The Ireland rugby team was also voted as team of the year with 43%. They were followed by the women's hockey team (17%) and the Limerick hurling team (8%).

The rugby team also claimed the top two spots in the Greatest Sporting Achievement category, with beating the All Blacks in November number one (40%) and winning the Grand Slam number two with 15%.

The women's hockey team coming second in the World Cup was third (7%) while Limerick winning the All-Ireland and Katie Taylor retaining the WB Lightweight belt came joint fourth (both 5%).

Taylor was voted as the nation's most admired athlete, getting 19% in the survey. She was joined by Sexton (11%) and the O'Dononovan brothers (10%).

The Teneo Sport and Sponsorship Index is 1,000 person nationally representative survey released annually.

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