Cork GAA condemns use of Confederate flag at games

The Cork County Board has said it “outright condemns” the flying of the Confederate flag in support of the county’s GAA teams, writes Conall Ó Fátharta and Denis Hurley.

The use of the flag by some Cork fans has been the subject of criticism in the past but was again in the headlines this week after it was visible on Hill 16 during Cork’s defeat to Waterford in the All-Ireland hurling semi-final.

The Confederate flag flown at a Cork game in 2015.
The Confederate flag flown at a Cork game in 2015.

The use of the flag caused outrage on social media as it came just 24 hours after violence by white supremacists at a far-right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in the US left one woman dead and a number of people injured.

The flag dates from the American Civil War and was used by the pro-slavery Confederate states. It has since been used by elements of the far right in the US.

At last night’s monthly Cork County Board meeting at the Nemo Rangers complex, Cork chairman Ger Lane made clear his opposition to the waving of the flag.

“The flying of the confederate flag in Croke Park on Sunday is something which must be addressed,” he said.

“Now, it must also be taken in the context of there being 72,022 people there and only a few flags. That said, people bringing flags into the ground, maybe some do it in ignorance, maybe some do it not in ignorance. The Cork County Board would advise anybody with any knowledge of people with these flags not to bring them in, education is needed.

“The board and the executive condemn outright the use of the confederate flag and ask people to refrain to bring it to any ground in the future.

“The only flag is the red and the white one with the Cork emblem on it.”

However, Independent councillor Michael Finn said the flying of the flag had to be “taken in context”.

“Yes, maybe people’s sensitivities and sensibilities are aroused at the moment because of what is going on in the States but I honestly think that the flag being flown by Cork supporters is not a political statement,” he told RTÉ.

This story first appeared in the Irish Examiner.


More in this Section

The scary bit is that the champs are far from finishedThe scary bit is that the champs are far from finished

Wales train with ‘wet balls and baby oil’ ahead of World Cup openerWales train with ‘wet balls and baby oil’ ahead of World Cup opener

'We were immensely proud of her': Bohan shares moving story of Dublin mascot'We were immensely proud of her': Bohan shares moving story of Dublin mascot

Fury toasts surgeons after having 50 stitches in eye woundFury toasts surgeons after having 50 stitches in eye wound


Lifestyle

I’m giggling but also it is tinged with tension. I peep out from behind the large sycamore. They are three trees away.Opening Lines: I’m just a bearded wheezing giggly man on the ground

I did my Leaving Cert in June and have just started college this week, so my school experience is extremely fresh in my memory. I went to Davis College in Mallow and it was a fantastic experience. I was the loud obnoxious child at the back of the classroom from day one. I had to (and still do, by the way) have an opinion on everything.Stand up and be counted : The Young Offender's Demi Isaac Oviawe on college and school life

When I was in secondary school I started working part-time as a waitress and I suppose I caught the hospitality bug back then.You've been served: General manager at Inchydoney Island Lodge & Spa Caitriona O’Keeffe

That an American study has found straight women prefer dad bods (“an untoned and slightly plump male physique, especially one that is considered attractive”) to six packs and hard shiny abs comes as no great surprise.Outside the Box: Tone down guys, us girls don’t mind moobs

More From The Irish Examiner