Working Life: Elaine Buckley, National Tobacco Cessation Coordinator

Elaine Buckley, national tobacco cessation coordinator, Tobacco Free Ireland Programme

Elaine Buckley
Elaine Buckley

6am

I get up, jump in the shower, then head downstairs for coffee.

6.30am

Log onto my laptop, check my emails, follow up on queries.I’ve been working from home in Tipperary since the Covid-19 crisis began due to social distancing requirements and lack of childcare, as my husband is working in essential services. It’s a big change as I’m usually in Dublin at least one day a week, with lots of face-to-face meetings.

8am

Most of the Tobacco Free Ireland programme team have been redeployed to assist with the pandemic, so I’m providing cover in their absence. I have a quick call and handover with the Tobacco Free Ireland (TFI) lead to plan out priority work.

8.30am

My husband leaves for work and our four year old gets a bit upset. But as I stagger my work shift by starting earlier in the morning, it allows me to spend some time with him. Working from home without the support of my usual child care facility is quite challenging.

9.30am

I spend the morning on projects and different priority tasks set out by the TFI lead. We recently launched this year’s QUIT campaign to encourage smokers to quit for at least 28 days. If you can quit for 28 days, you’re five times more likely to quit for good.

11am

Snack time for my son, coffee time for me. We squeeze in a few cuddles. He’s missing his friends at Montessori.

11.30am

I follow up on calls via Skype, reviewing documents with colleagues and signing off on work.

1pm

My son and I have lunch. He then heads for the trampoline and I head to my laptop.

2pm

I continue working on projects and answering queries. There’s lots of discussion about smoking and Covid-19. Smoking is a well-established risk factor for chest infections — quitting helps build your natural resistance to all types of infections including Covid-19.

When you quit, the natural hairs in your airways (cilia) begin to work again and your cell immunity improves therefore quitting now is more important than ever.

5.30pm

My husband arrives home, giving me a chance to jump back on the laptop while dinner is cooking.

  •  For more information about the QUIT visit www.Quit.ie or www.facebook.com/HSEQUIT
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