VFI propose allowing convicted drink-drivers at lower end of scale to drive to work

VFI propose allowing convicted drink-drivers at lower end of scale to drive to work

Update: Proposals to allow convicted drink drivers to drive to work are being considered.

The Vintner's Federation of Ireland wants the Government to look into the issue in the wake of the new drink drive laws introduced in October.

They have seen automatic driving bans, fines and penalty points brought in for those caught over the limit.

Padraig Cribben, the CEO of the VFI, said a similar move has been proposed in other countries.

Mr Cribben said: "What we are looking at is the detail of a scheme that's in New Zealand where those that are caught, very much at the lower end of the scale, would have the facility to use their car for transport to and from work.

"Bear in mind that the most recent change in the legislation in Ireland has really only affected those at the very bottom end of the scale."

Earlier: Minister considering VFI proposal to allow convicted drink-drivers to drive to work

The Government is considering allowing convicted drink-drivers to drive to work.

Officials have been asked to examine a system in operation in New Zealand.

In New Zealand, a person can apply for a limited licence that would allow them to drive at specific times for specific reasons.

They must prove to a court their driving ban causes them extreme hardship or undue hardship to someone else.

The Sunday Business Post reports that if the move was considered in Ireland it would be most likely in cases where people need their car in order to get to and from work.

VFI propose allowing convicted drink-drivers at lower end of scale to drive to work

According to the paper, Transport Minister Shane Ross would consider any such proposal from the Vintner's Federation of Ireland.

Ireland's tough drink-driving laws have seen automatic driving bans, fines and penalty points introduced for those caught over the limit.

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