Terminology of ‘anaesthesia’ changed in line with global best practice

Terminology of ‘anaesthesia’ changed in line with global best practice

The College of Anaesthetists of Ireland has announced that the terms ‘anaesthesia’ and ‘anaesthetist’ will be replaced with ‘anaesthesiology’ and ‘anaesthesiologist’.

Minister for Health Simon Harris is set to unveil a plaque at the college in Merrion Square today, officially renaming the College as College of Anaesthesiologists of Ireland.

Speaking ahead of the official launch, Minister Harris said:

“The role of the anaesthesiologist in our hospitals can sometimes be an invisible one – people are usually aware of who their surgeon is, but they might not be aware of a key player in their hospital journey – the anaesthesiologist, a highly qualified, specialist doctor playing a hugely valued medical role of critical importance.

"Patient safety is a top priority for me and it is also the guiding principle and constant commitment of anaesthesiologists.

This terminology change is in line with global best practice and acknowledges the wider role of the anaesthesiologist.

The World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesia (WFSA) defines anaesthesiology as the medical science and practice of anaesthesia.

It includes subspecialty areas of practice, such as perioperative medicine, pain medicine, resuscitation, trauma management and intensive care medicine.

The WFSA views the delivery of anaesthesia as a medical practice and an anaesthesiologist as a qualified physician who has completed a nationally-recognised medical training programme in anaesthesiology.

President of the College of Anaesthesiologists of Ireland, Professor Kevin Carson, said:

"This rebranding provides us with an opportunity to better inform the general public of the pivotal perioperative role anaesthesiologists play.

Many people are unaware that we are highly qualified, specialist medical doctors involved in the management of patients during their full surgical journey, from the time of consideration of surgery, surgery itself, and after their discharge home.

- Digital Desk

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