Irish beef farmers in top 5 most carbon efficient producers, says IFA president

Irish beef farmers in top 5 most carbon efficient producers, says IFA president

Irish farmers are doing more for climate change than other countries, the head of the Irish Farmers Association (IFA) has said.

Joe Healy was responding to calls from the Green Party for a cull of the national herd to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Mr Healy told RTÉ radio’s Morning Ireland that the size of national herd is a myth and that Ireland is one of the most carbon-efficient producers of beef in Europe.

The national herd is now lower than it was in 1998, he said.

“We have less than seven million head of cattle, take the likes of Brazil for example, they have 230 million head of cattle.

“If we reduce the size of the national herd here all we do is allow countries that are much less carbon efficient than Irish farmers are to fill that gap and produce the meat that will be required and that is required on the global markets for meat or dairy products.

“The European Commission joint research centre has highlighted very clearly that Ireland is the most carbon efficient producer of dairy product in Europe and in the top five most carbon efficient producers of beef in Europe,” added Mr Healy.

We're very clear in the IFA that our members are doing a lot for climate change, there are always ways we can do more.

The IFA president warned that demand for beef will grow by 17% between now and 2027.

“If that beef is not produced in what is acknowledged as a carbon producer of beef it will be done by countries that are that are a lot less efficient.

“Climate change is not just an Irish issue. It's a global issue. Since 1990 we have increased our agricultural output by 40% and in that time we've done that by not increasing our carbon emissions.

“We now have a road map, we're one of the very few sectors that has a road map to follow, that's the Teagasc climate abatement plan and what we need is to ensure is that there's government support, that the infrastructure is in place to allow farmers to achieve the targets that are there and that the potential that can be achieved.”

More on this topic

Greta, don’t sink the green messageGreta, don’t sink the green message

Report puts Glasgow on road to becoming carbon neutral by 2030Report puts Glasgow on road to becoming carbon neutral by 2030

Indonesian man walking 430 miles backwards to save forestsIndonesian man walking 430 miles backwards to save forests

Technological ‘solutions’ pose large-scale risk to environmentTechnological ‘solutions’ pose large-scale risk to environment

More in this Section

Teens to be surveyed on suicide issues at supports showcase in Cork’s City HallTeens to be surveyed on suicide issues at supports showcase in Cork’s City Hall

Doughnut store makes a lot of dough — €42k a dayDoughnut store makes a lot of dough — €42k a day

'Available Places' scheme for students who didn't accept CAO offer today opened'Available Places' scheme for students who didn't accept CAO offer today opened

McHugh tells schools to offer special placesMcHugh tells schools to offer special places


Lifestyle

IF you are the parent of a child who is about to venture forth into the hallowed halls of Primary education, or ‘Big School’ as every Irish mammy refers to it since the dawn of time; well, chances are you’ve probably been very active in your Google searches looking for tips and advice on how to ease your child, and yourself, into this next chapter.Out of curiosity, I searched online for ‘Back to school advice’

More From The Irish Examiner