Farmers close pickets at more meat plants as beef price protest starts winding down

Farmers close pickets at more meat plants as beef price protest starts winding down

Update: Nine blockades have now ended at meat factories amid the ongoing beef price controversy.

A blockade at Kepak Athleague in Roscommon is the lastest to be removed and follows similar withdrawals in Cork, Kilkenny and Mayo.

It marks a further de-escalation in tensions after last weekends stakeholder agreement, with the Independent Farmers of Ireland saying it is hopeful further protests will end over the weekend.

Alison De Vere Hunt, who was among the protesters at Cahir, said demonstrators are “hopeful that a process has started to bring about reform”.

“We do not know what the future will hold but you can be assured we will not settle for empty promises and have no reservations in again highlighting our plight if necessary,” she added.

Independent TD Mattie McGrath welcomed the standing down of the protest in Cahir.

“I think the decision by the farmers in Cahir, and indeed their supporters, to step away from the factory gates, will give us all much-needed breathing space to assess and plot a way forward that will enable farmer and factory worker to be protected and that is something I very much welcome,” he said.

Earlier: Farmer pickets were removed from a number of meat plants gates around the country overnight.

Protests at factories in Cork, Kilkenny and Mayo are the lastest to end after last weekend's agreement in the beef price row.

Last night, pickets outside Dawn Charleville, Dawn Grannagh, Dawn Ballyhaunis and Kepak Watergrasshill ended.

The final protesters also left ABP Cahir while Kepak Clones has indicated they are preparing to stand down over the weekend.

In a statement, the Independent Farmers of Ireland said, when added to other protests which have stood down, it is clear the majority have decided the proposal agreed last Sunday provides the best blueprint for the future.

It adds while the proposal is not ideal, it is clear the majority feel it can provide a solid foundation for the future.


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