EU vote brings controversial Shannon LNG gas terminal a step closer

EU vote brings controversial Shannon LNG gas terminal a step closer

The controversial Shannon LNG gas terminal is a step closer after a vote today in the European Parliament.

MEPs today voted down a motion objecting to a list of priority energy projects across the EU.

They include the Silvermines hydro-electric plant in Tipperary and the Shannon project, both of which are eligible for EU funding and fast-tracking.

Critics say it goes against climate targets and will lead to fracked gas being imported from the US.

MEPs today voted against a Green Group objection to the list.

Green Party MEP for Ireland South Grace O’Sullivan said it is a backwards move.

Ms O'Sullivan said: "In Ireland's case it's bringing fracked gas from Pennsylvania in the US into Shannon in Ireland.

"Because we are reminding the parliament that the Green Deal is front and centre here in Europe and because of climate chaos and biodiversity decline, it's really important that we move into renewable projects and that public money is spent in those areas and not going down a regressive path."

However, Fine Gael MEP Seán Kelly is warning that we might run out of gas due to the UK leaving the EU.

Mr Kelly said Ireland needs security of supply, saying: "By rejecting one particular project on the basis that it might have fracked gas won't reduce by one iota the amount of fracking that will take place in the US and elsewhere.

"This is a far bigger problem in terms of security of supply for Ireland, the Corrib gas line will be depleted in a number of years.

"We are now dependent on a third country, the UK, for our supply. If they change the rules we could find a situation down the line where we'd have no gas to heat our houses, to run our industries, to power our transport."

More on this topic

Mohamed A. El-Erian: We must be ready for the brave new worldMohamed A. El-Erian: We must be ready for the brave new world

The Irish Examiner View: Hope will not trump scienceThe Irish Examiner View: Hope will not trump science

UK financial watchdog plans climate change scrutinyUK financial watchdog plans climate change scrutiny

Only one in four willing to pay environmental taxes, research saysOnly one in four willing to pay environmental taxes, research says


More in this Section

Prisoners involved in five-hour hostage situation at Midlands PrisonPrisoners involved in five-hour hostage situation at Midlands Prison

Update: Kayleigh O'Brien has been found safe and wellUpdate: Kayleigh O'Brien has been found safe and well

Mayo council warns motorists of flash flooding risks in advance of yellow rain warningMayo council warns motorists of flash flooding risks in advance of yellow rain warning

€170m spent to put homeless families in emergency accommodation last year€170m spent to put homeless families in emergency accommodation last year


Lifestyle

Keep chomping on those carrots so your eyes will be in perfect working order for that prolonged annual gaze through the keyhole as Home of the Year returns for a sixth series next week.Home of the Year offers a good excuse for a bit of good-natured interiors voyeurism

They differ from the more prevalent oranges we eat because their flesh, and often the skin, is crimson or deep red in colour.Michelle Darmody: The best time of year to buy blood oranges

The annual Members Exhibition now underway at the Lavit Gallery in Cork features 92 works from 72 artists.The exhibition runs until March 7.Under the hammer: Your guide to upcoming auctions

There’s an oriental theme at the James Adam ‘At Home’ auction in Dublin, says Des O’SullivanAuctions: Sale full of eastern promise

More From The Irish Examiner