Dublin to see Children's Rally over climate change

Dublin to see Children's Rally over climate change
Students at a recent climate change protest in Dublin.

A new Children's Rally over climate change and other issues, including homelessness, is taking place in Dublin today.

The event in Temple Bar marks Cruinniú na nÓg, Ireland's national day of creativity for young people.

Up to 300 children will highlight their concerns in a demonstration organised by cultural centre The Ark.

It follows the recent climate change strikes around Ireland, which saw thousands of pupils take to the streets.

Aideen Howard, director of The Ark, said the success of those pickets shows children's voices can be heard.

Ms Howard said: "The right here right now Children's Rally is one of the highlights of a brand new festival of children the Ark is putting together, supported by Creative Ireland.

"So the Children's Rally is the really central part of that. The main issues, probably unsurprisingly are, around climate change and around homelessness.

"It really has been a mobilising factor for all of these children who are now understanding the idea that they, as citizens, have an equal right to protest to make their views heard and to be visible as children in what traditionally has been an adult space, in other words the space of protest or public demonstration."

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