Cork company's breathing monitor being used in hospitals around the globe

Cork company's breathing monitor being used in hospitals around the globe

A Cork company behind the only breathing monitor of its kind in the world is seeing sales increase because of Covid-19.

The breathing of 40 patients in Beaumont Hospital’s Covid-19 wards in Dublin is being monitored with PMD Solutions’ RespiraSense device.

It is now being adopted in three Dublin hospitals and one in Cork is evaluating it. As well as being gradually adopted in HSE hospitals, it has also been adopted by the National Health Service (NHS) in the UK. There, it is expected to be installed on beds of at least 30 hospitals by the end of 2021.

Hospitals in Canada, Belgium and Saudi Arabia are also taking it.

The device, which its creator and PMD Solutions founder Myles Murray has been developing since 2011, will cost as little as €7 per patient per day. It consists of a wireless lobe which is attached to a single use removable sensor which is placed on a patient’s rib cage.

It then monitors the patient’s breathing, sending the data to a bluetooth-enabled tablet. If their breathing rate goes above a certain threshold, an alarm goes off and alerts medics. Breathing is the only vital sign that is monitored manually in general hospital wards.

But it is done by a nurse watching a patient’’s chest rise and fall over a 60-second period and is not always the most accurate way of doing it.

The RespiraSense, on the other hand, has an error rate of just plus or minus one breath. This is also the first device that can monitor breathing remotely.

Anne Dorney, chief financial officer said: “An increased rate of breathing is the first indicator that something is wrong. The sooner you can detect changes, the sooner medical staff can act.

“Our device, which has gone through numerous clinical trials, can warn about a change in the breathing rate and signs of deterioration up to 12 hours earlier than the standard monitoring method.”

One of the main advantages for medics of using the device is that they don’’t have to keep donning Personal Protective Equipment to monitor the breathing of Covid-19 patients.

Meanwhile Aquila Bioscience has started delivery of its AntiBioAgent Decontamination Wipes (ABDs) to frontline services in Ireland, including the Defence Forces, the HSE and An Post.

The ABDs will serve as a safe and effective decontamination wipe for first-responders, healthcare workers and postal workers to reduce the spread of Covid-19.

ABDs contain components that bind to and decontaminate the surface, trapping the virus for safe disposal.

Unlike other decontamination methods, which contain chemicals that can be harmful to skin, ABDs contain no harmful ingredients and can be used on skin and sensitive mucosal areas such as eyes, nose and mouth.

NUI Galway-based Aquila says the concept for this technology was driven by the Irish Defence Forces and a need in the chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear protection measures.

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