Coast Guard saves 400 lives in 2018

Coast Guard saves 400 lives in 2018
Coast Guard helicopter, file photo

The Coast Guard saved 400 lives this year, their annual report has stated.

This is up 60 on last year's number as their director emphasised the importance of raising the alarm in time.

“If you can raise the alarm and you can stay afloat then you have an outstanding chance of being rescued by our world-class rescue service,” said Chris Reynolds.

The Coast Guard’s three rescue Coordination Centres at Malin Head, Valentia Island and Dublin managed a total of 2650 incidents which saw a rise of 150 over 2017.

The report also reveals that over 1,100 missions were conducted including volunteers.

“I want to particularly acknowledge the commitment and professionalism of our volunteer members, Mr Reynolds emphasised.

"In addition to the three core services that they provide they are an integral part of community resilience and continually act as the eyes and ears of our RCCs in assessing and responding to any coastal emergency.”

The volunteers were to the fore of the Coast Guard's efforts during storm Emma.

There were also 670 helicopter missions undertaken by the Coast Guard, including on behalf of the HSE and helping search for missing persons.

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