Claims of stand-off between US and Ireland over Trump visit dismissed

Claims of stand-off between US and Ireland over Trump visit dismissed

Claims of a stand-off between the US and Ireland over Donald Trump's planned visit are being dismissed.

It was reported the American President's trip here next month was in jeopardy because of a row over where he would meet Leo Varadkar.

According to the reports, Mr Trump wanted to meet at the Doonbeg International golf resort, which he owns with the Irish delegation preferring Dromoland Castle.

But the Irish Mail on Sunday says the Taoiseach is happy to meet Mr Trump at Shannon Airport as a compromise.

A US official told the paper the president's trip was not at risk of being cancelled.

CNN. quoting an "Irish government source" reported that the idea that the meeting would take place at a Trump-owned property was "unseemly":

"The Irish government feel that protocol dictates that any event they host for President Trump should be at a venue of their choosing and certainly not at a hotel owned by Trump."

"It is a bit unseemly to demand that the Taoiseach host President Trump at his hotel," their source added.

More on this topic

US Supreme Court backs Trump rule on birth control coverageUS Supreme Court backs Trump rule on birth control coverage

Trump criticises US sports teams for considering name changesTrump criticises US sports teams for considering name changes

Donald Trump decries cancel culture at Mount Rushmore eventDonald Trump decries cancel culture at Mount Rushmore event

Trump brands reports of Russian bounties for killing US troops ‘fake news’Trump brands reports of Russian bounties for killing US troops ‘fake news’

More in this Section

Four men arrested following seizure of cannabis worth €40k in CorkFour men arrested following seizure of cannabis worth €40k in Cork

HSE chief expects a million downloads of Covid-19 tracker app in first 24 hoursHSE chief expects a million downloads of Covid-19 tracker app in first 24 hours

Eamon Ryan missed opportunity to promote women and unite the party, says Catherine MartinEamon Ryan missed opportunity to promote women and unite the party, says Catherine Martin

Covid-19: Airborne transmission cannot be ruled out, says WHOCovid-19: Airborne transmission cannot be ruled out, says WHO


Lifestyle

BETWEEN 1973 and early 1975, John Lennon split with Yoko Ono, took up with his assistant May Pang and embarked on a period of intense creativity and outrageous behaviour. Lennon later described this time as his “lost weekend”.Rufus Wainwright has returned a new man

Stan O’Sullivan tells Ellie O’Byrne about the genre-busting album from 2007 that probably doesn’t get the recognition it deservesB-Side the Leeside - Cork’s Greatest Records: Louder & Clearer from Stanley Super 800

Lucy Lafferty, 28, from Co. Cavan, is a health and nutrition advisor in Niger, West Africa with Irish aid agency Concern Worldwide. Lucy explains here why she decided to stay in Niger – with just 20 ventilators for 22 million people - so she could help with the charity’s Covid-19 response.'Should I stay or should I go now? Working with Concern in Niger, I'm facing tough decisions'

Can mindfulness go from wellness pursuit to medical intervention? Maybe - but only if researchers can work out how to measure it. Kim Tingley reports.Measuring mindfulness

More From The Irish Examiner