Ancient burial site discovered in Kerry

Ancient burial site discovered in Kerry

By Sean Ryan

Excavations of what is thought to be the oldest surviving structure in Kerry have uncovered a burial site which dates back almost 6,000 years.

The dolmen or portal tomb at Killaclohane, Milltown is the oldest such structure still intact anywhere in Kerry according to the county archaeologist, Michael Connolly.

The tomb, on a site between Milltown and Castlemaine, dates from around 3,800 BC and had never been excavated before.

A team of archaeologists recently undertook conservation works to ensure that the capstone on the tomb – which had slipped off its supporting portal stones – would not fall completely and irreparably damage the two upright pillars.

According to archaeologist Michael Connolly "during the excavations, the cremated remains of at least two people were discovered along with a number of arrowheads, scrapers, neolithic pottery and a flint javelin head".

The precise dating of those objects may take several months but they are believed to be from the early Neolithic period.

The discovery suggests that one of the earliest settlements in the county was in the Milltown area when people began to farm and develop ties to the land.

Connolly has described the discovery as "very important".


More in this Section

Deal creating EU border in Irish Sea closerDeal creating EU border in Irish Sea closer

The key players in the UK’s hunt for a Brexit dealThe key players in the UK’s hunt for a Brexit deal

Talk of Northern Ireland-only backstop off the mark – Arlene FosterTalk of Northern Ireland-only backstop off the mark – Arlene Foster

Limerick IT and Athlone IT forming consortium to develop Technological UniversityLimerick IT and Athlone IT forming consortium to develop Technological University


Lifestyle

We know porridge is one of the best ways to start the day but being virtuous day in, day out can be boring.The Shape I'm In: Food blogger Indy Power

Sheila O’Flanagan can’t pin down an exact number of books she has written.First lady of fiction: Sheila O'Flanagan is happy to be accessible

This might not be the most entertaining topic but it is that time of year when colds, flus and nasty bugs enter classrooms and homes.Mum's the Word: Top tips for keeping nasty bugs and illnesses at bay

Laura Whalen is a Munster-based dollmaker and mother-of-five, and the founder of the Bábóg project, a community crafting drive to make a commemorative doll for all the babies born in Irish mother and baby homes.Made in Munster: Meet the West Cork dollmaker who uses bio-degradable materials for her craft

More From The Irish Examiner